Theodosius Dobzhansky


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Dobzhansky, Theodosius

 

(Feodosii Grigor’evich Dobrzhanskii). Born Jan. 12 (25), 1900, in Nemirov, in what is now the Ukrainian SSR; died Dec. 19, 1975, in Davis, Calif. American geneticist. Member of the National Academy of Sciences (1941) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dobzhansky graduated from the University of Kiev in 1921. He taught at Leningrad University from 1924 until 1927, when he emigrated to the United States. From 1929 to 1940 he taught at the California Institute of Technology, becoming a professor of genetics in 1936. From 1940 to 1962 he was a professor of zoology at Columbia University in New York, and from 1962 to 1970 he was a professor at Rockefeller University in New York. He became a professor of genetics at the University of California at Davis in 1971.

Dobzhansky was one of the founders of experimental population genetics and the author of the synthetic theory of evolution. He made a major contribution to the study of isolating mechanisms of evolution. Dobzhansky was a fellow of the Royal Society of London and other foreign academies of sciences.

WORKS

Genetics and the Origin of Species, 3rd ed. New York, 1951.
Heredity and the Nature of Man. London, 1965.
Genetics of the Evolutionary Process. New York–London, 1970.
Evolution. San Francisco, 1977. (With other authors.)

REFERENCES

Ayala, F. J. ‘Theodosius Dobzhansky: The Man and the Scientist.” Annual Review of Genetics, 1976, vol. 10, pp. 1–6.
Beardmore, J. A. “Theodosius Dobzhansky, 1900–1975.” Heredity, 1976, vol. 37, no. 1.
Ehrman, L., and B. Wallace. “Theodosius Grigorievich Dobzhansky.” Nature, 1976, vol. 260, no. 5,547, p. 179.
References in periodicals archive ?
Na Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), influenciado pelo importante professor da genetica brasilera Andre Dreyfus e por seu colega Theodosius Dobzhansky da Universidade de Columbia, Pavan conduziu sua faina profissional para o estudo do misterio dos gens e sua utilizacao para o bem da humanidade.
The great geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky is often quoted as saying, "Nothing in biology means anything except in the context of evolution.
This famous statement by Theodosius Dobzhansky is widely quoted by evolutionary biologists.
A great debt is owed to one of Powell's mentors, Theodosius Dobzhansky, who left his native Russia to visit Morgan's Drosophila laboratory at Columbia University in 1927 and never returned.
Shipman recounts a significant moment in the formation of physical anthropology as a modern discipline, a conference in 1950 at Cold Spring Harbor Biological Laboratory organized by Sherwood Washburn and Theodosius Dobzhansky.
In 1937 the Russian-born American geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky (1900-1975), who worked with fruit flies after the fashion of Morgan (see 1927), published a book entitled Genetics and the Origin of Species in which mutation and evolution were neatly joined together.
Those who receive the most coverage are evolutionary biologists Theodosius Dobzhansky, J.
Biology continues to generate an ever-expanding body of molecular, genetic and population data that has only confirmed, in the words of noted evolutionary biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky, that "nothing in biology makes sense, except in the light of evolution.
109) original de Theodosius Dobzhansky y que Potter, ademas de explorar desde la perspectiva meramente biologica que identifica con los riesgos de una fertilidad humana sin control, hace extensivo a la evolucion cultural: "una idea es por lo general juzgada en terminos del presente y no en terminos del futuro.
Mayr (1942) himself, following Theodosius Dobzhansky (1937), defines species as "groups of actually or potentially interbreeding natural populations, which are reproductively isolated from other such groups.
Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution" was the title of an article by world-famous geneticist and evolutionist Theodosius Dobzhansky (1973; posted with permission at http://people.
Given that Theodosius Dobzhansky, one of the 20th century's leading scientists, said that "nothing in biology makes sense, except in the light of evolution," I'd be leery of anyone giving me antibiotics who doesn't care to acknowledge the evolution of drug-resistant bacteria.