Theophrastus


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Theophrastus

(thē'ōfrăs`təs) [Gr.,=divinely speaking], c.372–c.287 B.C., Greek philosopher, Aristotle's successor as head of the PeripateticsPeripatetics
[Gr.,=walking about; from Aristotle's manner in teaching], the followers of Aristotle. Theophrastus, friend of Aristotle and cofounder with him of the Peripatetic school of philosophy, succeeded him as its head (323 B.C.) and did much to bring it into favor.
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. The school flourished under his leadership. He wrote on many subjects, but his works on plants are perhaps the most important of his technical writings. His Characters, a series of sketches of various ethical types, provides a valuable picture of his time. It anticipates such studies as those by Sir Thomas Overbury, John Earle, and La Bruyère.

Theophrastus

 

(“possessor of divine speech”; real name, Tyrtamos). Born circa 372 B.C. in Eresus, Lesbos; died circa 287 B.C. in Athens. Greek philosopher and natural scientist. One of history’s earliest botanists.

Theophrastus studied first with Plato and then with Aristotle. He was the author of A Manual of Rhetoric, which has not been preserved, and of Characters, a collection of 30 short sketches of character types, such as the flatterer and the idle talker. Characters has served as a model for many modern moralists.

WORKS

Les Caractères. Edited by O. Navarre. Paris, 1952.
In Russian translation:
Issledovanie o rasteniiakh. Moscow, 1951.
In [Menander] Komedii [Herodas] Mimiamby. Moscow, 1964.

REFERENCE

Stroux, J. De Theophrasti virtutibus dicendi. Leipzig-Berlin, 1907.

Theophrastus

?372--?287 bc, Greek Peripatetic philosopher, noted esp for his Characters, a collection of sketches of moral types
References in periodicals archive ?
An aporia posed by Theophrastus prompts Priscian to describe the process by which perception formally assimilates to its object as a progressive perfection.
The world of Theophrastus studies is rather a small one, a fact which this collection of essays both acknowledges and takes full advantage of: eight of the fourteen critics cited in the bibliography have been included amongst the ten contributors to this volume.
Fionnaula Dillane's Before George Eliot examines Marian Evans' relationship with the periodical press and the personae she constructed, including the '"character of editress' (Evans' own ironic description); the ambiguously gendered reviewer; the casuist and companion of her clerical scenes who is at once obvious and opaque"; and finally the "pompous city bachelor Theophrastus Such" (6).
When Theophrastus describes the disagreeable man, he appears to link the female piper, symposium, and prostitution.
Theophrastus was Aristotle's student and successor as head of the Lyceum, but he is best remembered for Characters, which represents an alternative to the influential Aristotelian vision of character (Kennedy 194).
Gutas and Fortenbaugh earlier collaborated on a study of Theophrastus and a major recent contribution is Gutas' study and edition of Theophrastus' On First Principles.
Champion looks at the role of Plato and the Platonic Tradition in the philosophical dialogues Theophrastus and Ammonius, written by two Gazans, Aeneas and Zacharias respectively.
She attends to the nagging challenges posed by omniscience, presumed omniscience, and over-sympathizing in works by Eliot (especially The Lifted Veil and Impressions of Theophrastus Such), Conrad (The Nigger of the 'Narcissus') and James (The Sacred Fount).
Biographers and commentators (4) have competed in finding him a divine destiny illustrated even by his name: Theophrastus, the "divine speaker," was the nickname given by Aristotle to his disciple, philosopher Theophrastus (3rd century BC).
66) Theophrastus reports that a small dose of this mixture produces an easy and painless death: 'Thrasyas of Mantineia had discovered, as he said, a poison which produces an easy and painless end.
In keeping too with his aim to trace and explicate her intellectual development, he spends only five of the ten chapters on the novels, choosing to spend four chapters on the intellectual development that prepared her to become a novelist and a final chapter on her final essays, which complete a neat arc from non-fiction through a wealth of fiction to a cluster of essays narrated by a fictional Theophrastus Such.