general relativity

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Related to Theory of General Relativity: Theory of special relativity

general relativity

See relativity, general theory.

general relativity

[¦jen·rəl ‚rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The theory of Einstein which generalizes special relativity to noninertial frames of reference and incorporates gravitation, and in which events take place in a curved space.
References in periodicals archive ?
After a decade of intense mathematical and theoretical work, including pondering the bucket experiment, in 1915 Einstein proposed his theory of general relativity (Gribanov, 1987).
In his theory of general relativity, Einstein predicted the extent to which light curves.
Dr Mohammad Sharif said the conference was devoted to celebrate centenary of Einstein's theory of general relativity which he developed in November 1915 and was considered as a great scientific development in fundamental understanding of space, time and matter.
Einstein presented his theory of general relativity to the Prussian Academy of Sciences in 1915, though it wasn't officially published until the following year.
Black holes are a natural consequence of Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity.
Three astrophysicists from Cardiff University hope that nearly a century after Einstein proposed his theory of general relativity it can at last be put to the test.
This satellite will conduct a special experiment to test aspects of Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity.
Albert Einstein (1879-1955) was a German theoretical physicist who developed the theory of general relativity, effecting a revolution in physics.
He went on to develop the theory of general relativity, effecting a revolution in physics.
Summary: Huge objects in the universe distort space and time with the force of their gravity, scientists said after a NASA probe confirmed two key parts of Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity.
It will investigate the possibility of life on far off planets, and will even test Einstein's theory of general relativity, it added.
Ten years later, working in Zurich but also in Berlin, he incorporated the effects of masses and developed the theory of general relativity.