Thersander

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Thersander

(thərsăn`dər), in Greek legend, son of Polynices. He avenged his father's death in the expedition of the EpigoniEpigoni
, in Greek legend, the sons of the Seven against Thebes, who avenged the death of their fathers. Under the leadership of Adrastus and Alcmaeon, the Epigoni conquered Thebes 10 years after the Seven had fought alongside Polynices for the throne of Thebes.
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 and was made king of Thebes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These are conservative claims; the greater praise is this: 'A virgin even after Thersandros, who was more brutal than bandits' (6.
I refer to the episode of Thibron and the aulos-player Thersandros during Sparta's campaign against Strouthas in the Maiandros valley during 391 B.
For Thersandros was not only a good aulos-player, but also made some claim to prowess as the active partner in anal sex.
Nor does this faltering explanation deal with the wider problem, that the whole incident concerning Thersandros seems intended to explain why Thibron was so easily surprised by the enemy.
In it, the attempted rape of a "slave woman" named Leukippe (in fact a woman of free birth) by her "master" Thersandros, and his threats to use torture to enforce his will on her, is resisted by her with the following words:
38) Morgan (2007, 117) makes a similar point about the narrator's analysis of the motivations behind Thersander's tears: 'He is projecting on to his adversary the performative nature of his own amatory behaviour, and so unwittingly telling us more about himself than about Thersandros.
Characters such as Kleinias, Satyros, Menelaos, Thersandros, and Sosthenes circle constantly around the perspective offered by Kleitophon on the central love affair, and in the course of this paper I will try to draw out something of their importance.
Helen Morales, in her book-length study Vision and Narrative in Achilles Tatius, gives an account of the different social types surrounding the lovers, picking out Thersandros, Konops and Kallisthenes in particular as negative 'embodiments of social and moral values and as representatives of different ways of viewing the world,' who 'to a certain extent .
Thersandros offers the prime example of negative social positioning by the narrator.
and the speech by the priest of Artemis accusing Thersandros of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
Moreover they display behavior that befits this privileged rank, exercising bravery and generosity in helping the heroes, rather than acting for their self-interest like Thersandros or Manto for example.
A triumph of good over evil appears in the crucifixion of Chariton's Theron, the exile of Achilles Tatius' Thersandros, and the defeat of Helidorus' Persians by Hydaspes.