Theseus


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Theseus

(thē`syo͞os, –sēəs), in Greek mythology, hero of Athens; son of either King Aegeus or Poseidon. Before Aegeus left Troezen he placed his sword and sandals beneath a huge rock and told his wife Aethra that when their son, Theseus, could lift the rock he was to bring the gifts to his kingdom in Athens. At the age of 16 Theseus lifted the rock and began his journey, during which he freed the countryside of various monsters and villains (e.g., ProcrustesProcrustes
, in Greek mythology, cruel highwayman. He forced passersby to lie on a very long bed and then stretched them to fit it. Some said that he also had a very short bed; to make passersby fit this he sawed off their legs. Using Procrustes' own villainous methods, Theseus killed him.
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). When Theseus arrived at Athens, Medea, then wife of Aegeus, tried to kill him. Aegeus, however, recognized the sword and sandals, saved Theseus, and exiled Medea. Theseus subsequently had numerous adventures. His most famous exploit was against the Minotaur of King Minos of Crete. Theseus insisted on being one of the seven youths and seven maidens of Athens to be sacrificed to the monster as an annual tribute. He promised his father that if he were successful in killing the Minotaur he would on his return voyage replace his ship's black sails with white ones. Ariadne, daughter of King Minos, fell in love with Theseus and gave him a magic ball of thread to be dropped at the entrance of the labyrinthlabyrinth
, intricate building of chambers and passages, often constructed so as to perplex and confuse a person inside. In Egypt, Amenemhet III of the XII dynasty built himself a funeral temple in the form of a great labyrinth near Lake Moeris.
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; it led Theseus to the Minotaur, which he killed, and he then followed the unwound thread back to the entrance. He left Crete with Ariadne but abandoned her at Naxos. When Theseus reached home he forgot to raise white sails. Aegeus saw black sails, and, thinking his son dead, the grief-stricken father threw himself into the sea, thereafter called the Aegean. As king of Athens, Theseus instituted several reforms, most notably the federalization of the scattered Attic communities. He journeyed to the land of the Amazons, where he abducted Antiope, who bore him HippolytusHippolytus,
in Greek mythology, son of Theseus and Antiope (or Hippolyte). After the death of Antiope, Theseus married Phaedra, daughter of Minos. Because Hippolytus worshiped only Artemis, the jealous Aphrodite punished him by causing his stepmother to fall in love with him.
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. A vengeful Amazon army invaded Athens, but Theseus defeated it. Some say Antiope died fighting beside him in the battle; others claim that Theseus killed her when she objected to his marriage to PhaedraPhaedra
, in Greek mythology, daughter of Minos and Pasiphaë. She was the wife of Theseus. When her stepson, Hippolytus, rejected her love, she accused him of raping her and hanged herself.
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. For helping PirithoüsPirithoüs
or Peirithoüs
, in Greek mythology, king of the Lapithae. He and Theseus swore an oath of eternal friendship. Together they went on the Calydonian hunt and invaded the land of the Amazons.
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 to carry off Persephone, Theseus was imprisoned in Hades until Hercules rescued him. Upon his return to Athens, he found his once great kingdom a turmoil of corruption and rebellion. He regretfully sailed away and came to rest at Skyros, where he was treacherously murdered by King Lycomedes. Although Theseus is generally thought of as legendary, the Athenians believed he had been one of their early kings.

Bibliography

See A. G. Ward et al., The Quest for Theseus (1970).

Theseus

 

a legendary Athenian hero and king traditionally thought to have lived about the 13th century B.C. Legend attributes a number of exploits to Theseus. For example, he is said to have fought against the Amazons, to have taken part in the voyage of the Argonauts and the Calydonian hunt, and to have killed the bandit Procrustes and the bull of Marathon. Historical deeds attributed to him include the freeing of Athens from dependence on Crete, the synoecism, or unification, of Attica, the establishment of the festivals of the Panathenaea and the Synoikia, the introduction of the Isthmian Games, and the first social division of the citizens of Athens—into eupatridae, geomoroi, and demiourgoi. The monthly festival of Theseia was celebrated in Athens in honor of Theseus.

Theseus

displays bravery in facing Minotaur; against Procrustes. [Gk. Myth.: Odyssey; Metamorphoses]
See: Bravery

Theseus

neglects to hoist the sail to signal his safety to his father Aegeus, who despairingly throws himself into the sea. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 12]

Theseus

escapes labyrinth with aid from Ariadne. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 31]
See: Escape

Theseus

hero of Attica who slew the Minotaur, conquered the Amazons, and helped drive off the Centaurs. [Gk. Myth.: Hamilton Mythology, 152]
See: Heroism

Theseus

(language)
A language based on Euclid, never implemented.

["Theseus - A Programming Language for Relational Databases", J.E. Shopiro, ACM Trans Database Sys 4(4):493-517, Mar 1979].
References in classic literature ?
cried King Aegeus, flinging away the fatal goblet, and tottering down from the throne to fall into the arms of Theseus.
And now Prince Theseus was taken into great favor by his royal father.
One morning, when Prince Theseus awoke, he fancied that he must have had a very sorrowful dream, and that it was still running in his mind, even now that his eyes were opened.
But King Aegeus shook his venerable head, and to convince Theseus that it was quite a hopeless case, he gave him an explanation of the whole affair.
But when Theseus heard the story, he straightened himself up, so that he seemed taller than ever before; and as for his face it was indignant, despiteful, bold, tender, and compassionate, all in one look.
It is because I am a prince, your son, and the rightful heir of your kingdom, that I freely take upon me the calamity of your subjects," answered Theseus, " And you, my father, being king over these people, and answerable to Heaven for their welfare, are bound to sacrifice what is dearest to you, rather than that the son or daughter of the poorest citizen should come to any harm.
The old king shed tears, and besought Theseus not to leave him desolate in his old age, more especially as he had but just begun to know the happiness of possessing a good and valiant son.
Just as Prince Theseus was going on board, his father bethought himself of one last word to say.
And, dearest Theseus, if by some happy chance, you should escape the jaws of the Minotaur, then tear down those dismal sails, and hoist others that shall be bright as the sunshine.
But while the vessel flew faster and faster towards Crete, Theseus was astonished to behold a human figure, gigantic in size, which appeared to be striding, with a measured movement, along the margin of the island.
The nigher the vessel came, the more Theseus wondered what this immense giant could be, and whether it actually had life or no.
Theseus asked of the master of the vessel, who was now at leisure to answer him.