third sector


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

third sector

a recent term for the voluntary sector of the economy, along side the state and capitalist private sector. In the UK the development of this sector has been encouraged by recent governments, both left and right, as a way of contracting, direct state provision.
References in periodicals archive ?
9) This "volunteerism" perspective is one which is dominated by the celebration of community volunteering, minimizing the role of the broader third sector and its on-going contractual relationships for service delivery.
The conference focuses on improving partnership working with the third sector to enable the most effective delivery of services, with both financial and social benefits.
The aim of this paper is to highlight the characteristics of third sector primary care organisations and provide an example of the type of practice environment likely to nurture NP care delivery models.
Now it is setting up Appreciation Works, a community interest company that will help third sector organisations "excel and grow".
Catalyst is a leading voice for Stockton's third sector.
Sir Albert said he feared smaller third sector groups would be put off applying for grants by the mountain of paperwork.
Since 2000 the third sector has benefited (in theory) in terms of resources, but provides very little evidence of improvements in terms of meeting the needs of communities, particularly the most vulnerable groups in our society.
Murrae Blair-Park, director for employer partnerships at the college, said: "The third sector is rapidly growing and is a very rewarding area to work in.
The third sector as an institutionalized form of civil society currently constitutes the weakest link in the Estonian democracy.
Working Together oversees the implementation of a strategy aiming to enhance the way the LSC works in partnership with the third sector and encourage greater engagement between the two.
The Third Sector in Europe Adalbert Evers and Jean-Louis Laville (eds), Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, UK, 2004, 266 pp.