Thomas Johann Seebeck


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Seebeck, Thomas Johann

 

Born Apr. 9, 1770, in Revel, now Tallinn; died Dec. 10, 1831, in Berlin. German physicist. Member of the Berlin Academy of Sciences (1818).

Seebeck studied medicine in Berlin and Göttingen. In 1821 he discovered a thermoelectric effect (the Seebeck effect). With J. Peltier he carried out a series of experiments showing the conversion of heat energy into electrical energy and vice versa. Seebeck also did work in physical optics, physical chemistry, and otherfields.

References in periodicals archive ?
1) Thomas Johann Seebeck Department of Electronics, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate St.
Pain said the boot uses the Seebeck effect, named after physicist Thomas Johann Seebeck, in which a circuit made of two dissimilar metals conducts electricity if the two places where they connect are held at different temperatures.
Pain said the boot uses the Seebeck effect, named after physicist Thomas Johann Seebeck, in which a circuit of two dissimilar metals conducts electricity if the two places where they connect are held at different temperatures.
The present Issue of the Proceedings of the Estonian Academy of Sciences, series Engineering, is devoted to Thomas Johann Seebeck, the nowadays most recognized scientist-naturalist ever born and grown up in Estonia, despite that he made his discoveries and scientific findings in Germany.
Current work has been supported by Estonian Research Council project IUT19-11, CEBE (Centre for Integrated Electronic Systems and Biomedical Engineering), Doctoral School in Information and Communication Technology of Estonia, and Tallinn University of Technology, Thomas Johann Seebeck Department of Electronics and the Estonian Forensic Science Institute.
The Thomas Johann Seebeck department of Electronics had just obtained the LED measurement equipment and for introductory research activities the measurement of 5 mm and highpower LEDs was planned.
Thomas Johann Seebeck is one of the most known scientists born and grown up in Estonia.
This thermoelectric effect is called after the inventor Thomas Johann Seebeck (1821).
The Conference was organized by the Thomas Johann Seebeck Department of Electronics together with the Department of Computer Engineering of TUT.
Thomas Johann Seebeck Department of Electronics, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn, 19086, Estonia, phone: +372 620 2155, e- mail: natalja@elin.
Thomas Johann Seebeck is usually referred to as the discoverer of one of the basic thermoelectric effects, the Seebeck effect.
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