Thomas precession


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Thomas precession

[′täm·əs prē′sesh·ən]
(relativity)
The precession of a vector in an accelerated system, relative to an observer for whom the system has a given velocity and acceleration, when this vector appears to be constant to an observer attached to the system; this precession is the kinematical basis of one type of spin-orbit coupling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demonstrating the power and elegance that emerges when Einstein's special theory of relativity is treated integrally with its underlying hyperbolic geometry, he covers Einstein gyrogroups and gyrovector spaces; mathematical tools for hyperbolic geometry; hyperbolic triangles and circles; hyperbolic symplices, hyperplanes, and hyperspheres in n dimensions; hyperbolic ellipses and hyperbolas; and Thomas precession.
In flat space-time the precession of an accelerated gyroscope is called Thomas Precession.