Thoreau


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Thoreau

Henry David. 1817--62, US writer, noted esp for Walden, or Life in the Woods (1854), an account of his experiment in living in solitude. A powerful social critic, his essay Civil Disobedience (1849) influenced such dissenters as Gandhi
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For Thoreau, she claims, this means an empirical science distinguished by artistic, subjective reports that provide needed orientation, as opposed to the dry, abstract reports of mainstream science.
If Thoreau achieved his morning work--and Walden appears to be just such a record, recollection, or fabrication--then what use has he, if any, of others, and they of him?
As an acknowledgement of this award, the FBA will make a donation on behalf of Camp Thoreau Inc.
Thoreau claimed he could live on six weeks' income for an entire year.
Thoreau it was who took himself off to the woods and lived "the simple life" for two years in a small cottage on the shore of Walden Pond, Massachusetts.
Part 2, "Henry Bugbee, Thoreau, Cavell," employs five chapters to address the roles of the wilderness, lyric philosophy of place, death and the sublime, becoming what we pray, and a pair of witnesses who also lead away from our "lost intimacy" with nature, other persons and ourselves.
Compulsive about putting historical events in a broader context - Eugene Skinner first arrived in Lane County as Thoreau was hunkering down in "the woods" - I was intrigued to learn, on page 217, that Thoreau "entered into residence on the fourth of July, 1845, to be reporter of Walden Pond for two years and three months.
An American flaneur happily devoid of the sidewalk Baron Von Haussmann invented for the perpetuation of the modern, Thoreau renames his walker a "saunterer," or a "Saint Terre--A Holy Lander.
Following his own conscience, Thoreau asserts that the American government of his time does not merit his support because it is unjust in two respects.
While at Harvard, Thoreau had read a book called Nature by fellow Concord resident, essayist and poet Ralph Waldo Emerson.
From this research, the following "picture" began to emerge: Henry David Thoreau maintained an acute interest in natural history of his native countryside in central New England throughout his relatively brief life.
Titled Walden: The Ballad of Thoreau, it is a play written and produced by folksinger Michael Johnathon, and tells the story of the final two days Thoreau spent in his cabin before leaving Walden Pond.