Thutmose III


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Thutmose III

(thŭt`mōz, tŭt`–) or

Thothmes III

(thŏth`mēz, tōt`mĕs), d. 1436 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; the successor of Thutmose IIThutmose II
or Thothmes II
, reigned c.1495–1490 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, fourth ruler of the XVIII dynasty and the son and successor of Thutmose I. Unlike Hatshepsut, his half-sister whom he married, Thutmose II did not have a royal mother.
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. After the death of Thutmose II, his wife HatshepsutHatshepsut
, d. 1458 B.C., ruler of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; eldest daughter of Thutmose I. She managed to rule Egypt by relegating her husband (and younger half-brother), Thutmose II, to the background during his brief reign.
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 became regent for Thutmose III and relegated him to an inferior position for 22 years while she ruled Egypt. At her death (1468 B.C.), he emerged as the sole ruler of Egypt and as a great conqueror. Almost immediately he advanced into Syria, where an Asian alliance against Egypt waited to oppose him. He was victor at MegiddoMegiddo
, city, ancient Palestine, by the Kishon River on the southern edge of the plain of Esdraelon, N of Samaria, located at present-day Tel Megiddo, SE of Haifa, Israel, near modern Megiddo. It was inhabited from the 7th millennium B.C. to c.450 B.C.
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 and consolidated all Syria, except Phoenicia, in his empire. In successive campaigns he reduced every ruler N of the Euphrates to the status of autonomous tributary and eventually conquered even powerful KadeshKadesh
, ancient city of Syria, on the Orontes River. There Ramses II fought (c.1300 B.C.) the Hittites in a great battle that ended in a truce.
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 and MitanniMitanni
, ancient kingdom established in the 2d millennium B.C. in NW Mesopotamia. It was founded by Aryans but was later made up predominantly of Hurrians. Washshukanni was its capital.
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, a kingdom E of the Euphrates River. His empire (the zenith of the New Empire), extending from the Third Cataract to the Euphrates, was used to enrich Egypt with wealth and manpower. He built temples up and down the Nile and founded the wealth of the priesthood of Amon, to which he belonged. Thutmose died after having made his son Amenhotep IIAmenhotep II
or Amenophis II
, d. c.1420 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; son and successor of Thutmose III. Amenhotep II succeeded (1448 B.C.) as coregent and later ruled alone for 26 years.
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 coregent, and was buried in the Valley of the Kings at Thebes. His mummy is now at Cairo.

Thutmose III

died c. 1450 bc, king of Egypt of the 18th dynasty, who completed the conquest of Syria and dominated the Middle East. He was also a patron of the arts and a famous athlete
References in periodicals archive ?
The earliest candidate is Thutmose III, which accords with use of the term "pharaoh" to describe the king.
Gabriel is correct that Thutmose III reestablished Egyptian influence in Canaan and Syria that lasted for centuries, but that influence was never complete or especially deep.
After her death, Thutmose III had her image and cartouche chiseled off most of her monuments, had her statues pulled down at her great temple over the ridge from the Valley of the Kings and had her written her out of the official history of the kings of Egypt.
Thutmose III, Hatshepsut's stepson and nephew, was too young to assume kingship at the time.
In the case of Hatshepsut, we face an additional problem, in that many works of art (and architecture) were deliberately destroyed by her stepson-nephew Thutmose III or were otherwise obscured over time.
She commandeered the throne from her young stepson, Thutmose III, dressed herself as a man and, in an unprecedented move, declared herself pharaoh.
The centerpiece is a full-sized replica of the tomb of Thutmose III, ruler of Egypt in the 15th century B.
IMMORTAL PHARAOH: TOMB OF THUTMOSE III, 10am-5pm City Art Centre, 2 Market Street, Edinburgh.
Students can "stroll" through the tomb of Pharaoh Thutmose III, view streaming slideshows of artifacts, such as a statue of Osiris, and watch a 10-minute video on the mummification process.
It is inherent in everything AFSOC does and is as important today as it was to Thutmose III over 3,000 years ago.
After ruling for 22 years, Hatshepsut stepped down, and Thutmose III replaced her.