Thwackum

Thwackum

selfish and ill-humored clerical pedagogue. [Br. Lit.: Tom Jones]
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References in classic literature ?
In the morning, when Tom attended the reverend Mr Thwackum, the person to whom Mr Allworthy had committed the instruction of the two boys, he had the same questions put to him by that gentleman which he had been asked the evening before, to which he returned the same answers.
The gamekeeper was now relieved from his anxiety, and Mr Allworthy himself began to be concerned at Tom's sufferings: for besides that Mr Thwackum, being highly enraged that he was not able to make the boy say what he himself pleased, had carried his severity much beyond the good man's intention, this latter began now to suspect that the squire had been mistaken; which his extreme eagerness and anger seemed to make probable; and as for what the servants had said in confirmation of their master's account, he laid no great stress upon that.
He could more easily bear the lashes of Thwackum, than the generosity of Allworthy.
cryed Thwackum, with some warmth, "mere stubbornness and obstinacy
This discourse happened at table when dinner was just ended; and there were present Mr Allworthy, Mr Thwackum, and a third gentleman, who now entered into the debate, and whom, before we proceed any further, we shall briefly introduce to our reader's acquaintance.
Thwackum and, a clergyman, only because he reprimanded him for following whores; and afterwards he snapped a pistol at Mr.
Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling 98 (1749) ("[T]hough they would both make frequent use of the word mercy, yet it was plain that in reality Square held it to be inconsistent with the rule of right; and Thwackum was for doing justice, and leaving mercy to Heaven.
The characters in eighteenth-century novels had emblematic names that clearly signified their personalities: the dashing rake Lovelace in Clarissa, Squire Allworthy and the brutish Thwackum in Tom Jones, the incompetent Dr.
In the next book (3: 6), Fielding employs a shorthand phrase to evoke the way the hero's tutor, Parson Thwackum, looked: "The Pedagogue did in Countenance very nearly resemble that Gentleman, who in the Harlot's Progress, is seen correcting the Ladies in Bridewel" (138).
Of course, both Tom Jones and Pride and Prejudice give us characters beyond redemption whose corrupted manners, conversation included, disrupt the lives of other people and their communities: Fielding's villains are Square, Thwackum, and Blifil, all of whom delude Squire Allworthy for some time (81-83, 106, 567-69, 585-87, 591-95).
Para concluir con las macroomisiones realizadas en las traducciones de la novela inglesa, tenemos que constatar que no se han suprimido solamente los capitulos introductorios a cada uno de los libros, sino que tambien en el contexto de la propia obra de ficcion se han omitido capitulos enteros, como por ejemplo el IV, 4 en el que Thwackum y Square discuten sobre el bien y el mal a raiz del incidente de liberar Blifil al pajaro de Sofia, o el VIII.
No parece existir una explicacion logica para que Fielding califique de bloody las batallas que no pasan de meras refriegas taberneras, de tempestuous el enfado que Western muestra al descubrir el amor entre Sophia y Tom, o de deep and grave las perniciosas y subjetivas opiniones de Thwackum y Square--que siempre presenta como enemigos del bueno de Tom--, sino la imitacion, consciente o inconsciente, de la adjetivacion hiperbolica propia de la dialectica de Don Quijote.