Thyssagetae


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Thyssagetae

 

ancient tribes that, according to Herodotus and other writers of antiquity, lived in an area east and northeast of the Budins and Sauromatians, the distance from the former constituting a seven days’ journey. The Thyssagetae were forest-dwelling hunters who ate mainly meat and made offerings of animal bones to their gods. They are believed by most scholars to have been part of a group of tribes that inhabited the forests in Trans-Volga and other regions west of the Urals, along the Kama, Viatka, Belaia, and Chusovaia rivers—the area comprising the Anan’ino culture. Some scholars, however, identify the Thyssagetae with the tribes of the Gorodetsk culture of the Volga-Oka interfluve. A third view is that the Thyssagetae were an ancient Finno-Ugric tribe from northeastern Europe.

REFERENCE

Herodotus. Istoriia v deviatii knigakh. Leningrad, 1972.
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