time-invariant system

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time-invariant system

[′tīm in‚ver·ē·ənt ‚sis·təm]
(control systems)
A system in which all quantities governing the system's behavior remain constant with time, so that the system's response to a given input does not depend on the time it is applied.
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References in periodicals archive ?
where [eta] is an unknown scalar parameter to be estimated, which determines whether inefficiencies are time varying or time invariant.
The most widely used proportional and integral (PI) control is designed for a linear time invariant system (Astrom et al.
i] represents the country-specific effect, which is assumed to be time invariant, and [[epsilon].
However, the channel must he linear (determined by driver behavior in the ope raring region) and time invariant for this analysis to be accurate.
We present two efficient iterative methods that can be used for the model reduction of either time varying or time invariant systems.
For disturbances with a longer duration of effect, or even time invariant disturbances, a new learning procedure or remapping is necessary.
When one or several independent variables are time invariant or rarely change over time, standard fixed-effects models are inappropriate, and a superior alternative to the regular FE model or other panel estimation models is the FEVD technique (Plumper and Troeger, 2007).
Consider a linear time invariant multivariable system defined in the state space form as
It can be modelled as the output of a linear time invariant system (during few milliseconds, the system can safely be assumed to be time invariant) driven by a periodic train of impulses.
We consider the trellis section of a time invariant group code and show that when this trellis section is a non abelian finite p-group, and the information set is the additive group of the integers module p, then the group code can not be controllable.
Apparently, the time invariant variables included do a relatively poor job in explaining the fixed effects for passengers who purchase tickets less than 14 days in advance: Only the "percentage of seats available on propeller planes" coefficient in the last column is statistically important, though the [R.
Fixed-effects methods are superior in this regard because they can control for both observed covariates and unobserved covariates that are time invariant.