Tingidae


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Tingidae: Miridae, Lygaeidae, Berytidae

Tingidae

[′tin·jə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The lace bugs, the single family of the hemipteran superfamily Tingoidea.

Tingidae

 

(lace bugs), a family of insects of the order Hemip-tera. The elytra and usually part of the thorax coverings have a reticular-alveolate structure and resemble lace (hence the name). The tarsi are two-jointed; ocelli are lacking. The body length is from 1.5 to 5 mm. There are more than 1,800 species (about 240 genera); in the USSR about 130 species.

Tingidae live, often in large congregations, on the leaves of plants, whose juices they feed on. They are not very mobile. The Stephanitis pyri, common in the southern European USSR, the Caucusus, and Middle Asia, damages the leaves of pear, apple, and other fruit trees, and also the leaves of wild trees and shrubs, especially lindens.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent phylogenetic studies of Tingidae (Guilbert 2001, 2004b), the lack of pronotal and hemelytral expansions in adults, as well as the lack of outgrowths in larvae, were hypothesized as plesiomorphic conditions.
Phylogeny and evolution of exaggerated traits among the Tingidae (Heteroptera, Cimicomorpha).
2% were in the four families Lygaeidae (362), Miridae (254), Pentatomidae (178), and Tingidae (230).
Family Tingidae Laporte, 1807 (=Tingididae; Tingitidae): the lace bugs, pp.
Detection of avocado lace bug, Pseudacysta perseae (Heidemann), Hemiptera: Tingidae in Yaracuy state.