Tisza, Kálmán


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Tisza, Kálmán

(käl`män tĭ`sŏ), 1830–1902, Hungarian premier (1875–90), of an old Calvinist family. He entered politics in the Hungarian revolution of Mar., 1848. Elected (1861) to the Hungarian parliament, he led the radical group that later opposed the Ausgleich [compromise] of 1867, which created the Austro-Hungarian MonarchyAustro-Hungarian Monarchy
or Dual Monarchy,
the Hapsburg empire from 1867 until its fall in 1918. The Nature of Austria-Hungary

The reorganization of Austria and Hungary was made possible by the Ausgleich
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. He was influential in maintaining Austro-Hungarian neutrality in the Franco-Prussian War. Having become (1875) premier of Hungary, he reversed his stand on the Ausgleich and formed the Liberal party, which dominated Hungarian politics during the following decades. His close support of the policies of Julius Andrássy, the Austro-Hungarian foreign minister, enabled Tisza to make Hungary an equal partner in the Dual Monarchy. During his 15-year premiership, Tisza rehabilitated Hungarian finances, introduced compulsory education, and strengthened the economic ties with Austria. He tried to absorb the Slavic and Romanian minorities into a Magyar culture and nation.

Tisza, Kálmán

 

Born Dec. 16, 1830, in Geszt, county of Békés; died Mar. 23, 1902, in Budapest. Hungarian state and political figure.

Tisza was a landowner. In the 1860’s he was one of the leaders of the bourgeois Resolutionists Party and later of the Left Center Party. While favoring the alliance of the Hungarian nobility with the Hapsburgs and the Austrian bourgeoisie, Tisza sought to gain broad popular support by publicly criticizing the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867. After recanting their apparent opposition to the agreement of 1867, Tisza and his supporters joined with Deák’s Party in 1875 to form the Liberal Party, of which Tisza became the leader. As head of the government from 1875 to 1890, Tisza advocated a policy of rapprochement with Germany.