Churinga

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Churinga

 

a sacred object of certain Australian tribes. Churingas are flat, decorated pieces of wood or stone that were kept in special hiding places and used in religious rites. They were regarded as totemic incarnations. Ornamented pebbles similar to churingas have been uncovered at habitation sites of the Mesolithic Azilian culture.

References in periodicals archive ?
the tjurunga are material representations of ancestral totemic Beings -- the stone or board is the body, the design on it relate to the travels and adventures of that being' (Berndt 1982:431); 'the designs on the boards .
tjurunga are endowed with the attributes of the Alcheringa ancestors.
Warlpiri men had been convinced of the need for the Museum, partly by fears that their tjurunga (4) were in danger of being stolen by gold prospectors and sold as curiosities.
The Men's Museum's most sacred tjurunga came to be stored beyond the view of visitors, in locked metal cabinets standing in two small side rooms.
Mythen, Sagen und Marchen des Loritja-Stammes in Zentral Australien & die Totemistischen Vorstellungen und die Tjurunga der Aranda und Loritja.
Stockton has the Aboriginal story of the youth who went beyond himself and changed the tjurunga and thus in effect changed something in the past.
Comparing sacred tjurunga from Central Australia to material culture from Early Bronze Age Ireland is not an original idea.
Morton cites the classic ethnographies of the Arrernte where the newborn child is said to cry because it misses its TJURUNGA (sacred board) it had to leave behind upon entering the mother's womb as a spirit child.
At every mile along the way in these early journeys, Strehlow was conjuring those nightmares as he found himself collecting tjurunga--nightmares because, as he was to write, the tjurunga were the most treasured possessions.
Compare also the range of meanings listed for tjurunga by Strehlow (9147:85-86).
The concept of sacredness is, however, important in Weiner's argument about inalienable possessions, whose cosmological authenticity derives from their links to gods or ancestors, creating objects such as Aboriginal tjurunga or Maori feather cloaks.
These were mainly carved stone or wooden tjurungas, called 'corroboree stones', for sale to southern collectors and museum collections.