Timbuktu

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Timbuktu

(tĭm'bŭkto͞o`, tĭmbŭk`to͞o), city (1987 pop. 31,925), central Mali, near the Niger River. Connected with the Niger by a series of canals, Timbuktu is served by the small river port of Kabara. Its salt trade and handicraft industries make it an important meeting place for the nomadic people of the Sahara.

Timbuktu was founded (11th cent.) by the TuaregTuareg
or Touareg
, Berbers of the Sahara, numbering c.2 million. They have preserved their ancient alphabet, which is related to that used by ancient Libyans.
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 as a seasonal camp. By the 14th cent., when it was part of the Mali empire (see History under MaliMali
, officially Republic of Mali, independent republic (2005 est. pop. 12,292,000), 478,764 sq mi (1,240,000 sq km), the largest country in W Africa. Mali is bordered on the north by Algeria, on the east and southeast by Niger, on the south by Burkina Faso and Côte
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), it had become one of the major commercial centers of the W Sudan region, famous for its gold trade. Under the SonghaiSonghai
or Songhay
, largest of the former empires in the western Sudan region of N Africa. The state was founded (c.700) by Berbers on the Middle Niger, in what is now central Mali. The rulers accepted Islam c.1000.
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 empire (15th and 16th cent.) the city was a great Muslim educational center, with more than 100 Qur'anic schools and a university centered at the Sankoré mosque, one of three great mosques there that are outstanding examples of local earthen buildings.

Timbuktu was sacked in 1593 by invaders from Morocco and never again recovered its leading position. It was repeatedly conquered by neighboring peoples until it was captured (1894) by the French. In recent years it has been threatened by the desertification of the surrounding region, and in 2012–13 it and the rest of N Mali was seized by Tuareg and Islamist rebels. After the Islamists gained ascendancy over their Tuareg allies, they destroyed city shrines to local Sufi saints (later rebuilt) as well as some of the city's ancient manuscripts.

Timbuktu

 

(also Tombouctou), a city in Mali, on the left bank of the Niger River. Population, 10,400 (1969). Timbuktu is a junction of caravan routes and a center for trade in salt, dates, and tobacco. The city was founded in the 11th or 12th century as a transfer point for caravan trade. In the 13th through 15th centuries Timbuktu was the most important economic and cultural center of the medieval state of Mali and, at the turn of the 16th century, of the Songhai kingdom. In 1893 the French seized Timbuktu. Its economic significance declined in the 20th century.

Timbuktu’s architectural monuments include numerous tombs and several important mosques—Dyingueré Ber (begun in the 13th century and rebuilt several times; it contains a series of courtyards and halls divided by columns), Sankoré (begun in the 14th century and rebuilt from the 16th through 18th centuries), and Sidi-Yahia (built circa 1440 and later restored). Timbuktu also has a museum of local lore.

Timbuktu

fabled land of wealth and splendor. [Eur. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1084]

Timbuktu

figuratively, the end of the earth. [Am. Usage: NCE, 2749]

Timbuktu

a town in central Mali, on the River Niger: terminus of a trans-Saharan caravan route; a great Muslim centre (14th--16th centuries). Pop.: 31 925 (latest est.)

Timbuktu

Popular remote control software for Windows and the Mac from Netopia, Inc., a Motorola company, Emeryville, CA (www.netopia.com). Timbuktu supports AppleTalk, TCP/IP, IPX, Skype software and Apple Remote Access protocols as well as direct dial up. Users can control, view and transfer files between Macs and Windows.
References in periodicals archive ?
During our 2004 fieldwork trip to Timbuktu we found that the watermarks we encountered in manuscripts in Timbuktu to be of an unexpected use.
This closely bound community of scholars lent book to one another; in an environment of scholarly collegiality, combined with the mitigating social factors and biases, allowed scholars to Timbuktu to hold to their traditions, largely ignoring the public library model of the greater Islamic world (Singleton 2004: 10).
In Mopti we transferred from minibus to four-wheel drive vehicles for the final stretch of the journey to Timbuktu.
In The Road to Timbuktu, Fremantle provides a vivid snapshot of modern West Africa, telling the stories of the people he meets, from a lovelorn Senegalese prostitute and a Bozo fisherman with a megawatt grin to a dignified Tuareg tribesman keen to keep his ancient traditions alive.
After the newspaper report came out, Khan told one of his friends that Maiga acted as a guide during his visits to Timbuktu, so he helped Maiga in constructing the small hotel.
Bamako To Timbuktu is on at the Biscuit Factory until October 28.
He spent an excruciating two years walking across the Sahara Desert to get to Timbuktu.
And as the soliloquising tramp succumbs to his final, fatal bilious attack and shuffles off to Timbuktu (the afterlife), the heartbroken hound sets off in search of a new life and new owner.
I caught a ride to Timbuktu proper, and by the skewed yellow lights of a Peugeot saw crumbling mud walls and the closed expressions of soldiers at an army roadblock.
For a limited time, current Timbuktu Pro customers may side grade to Timbuktu Pro 2000 directly from Netopia's Web site for as low as $20 per computer.
Thanks to Timbuktu, I was recently able to remotely ensure that an educational customer had everything working perfectly for an Internet demonstration with President Clinton.
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