Tohono O'odham Nation Rodeo

Tohono O'odham Nation Rodeo

Three days in February
The Tohono O'odham Nation Rodeo has been a tradition for more than 60 years. Thousands of visitors come to Sells, Arizona, for the event each year for three days of rodeo and festivities in February. Dancers from tribes nationwide recreate ceremonial dances designed to bring rain, cure illness, or prepare for war, while Native American cowboys and cowgirls compete for $40,000 in prize money in such events as bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, calf roping, steer wrestling, and barrel racing. Craft shows highlight the work of local Tohono O'odham and Pima artists and craftspeople, along with Maricopa pottery and baskets and Hopi kachina dolls.
The Tohono O'odham Nation, which in 1986 changed its name from Papago (meaning "Bean People") to Tohono O'odham (which means "Desert People"), have lived in the desert regions of what is now Arizona and Mexico for centuries. They are renowned for their ability to grow food in the desert, and the festival features lots of traditional Indian foods, including fry bread and barbecue.
CONTACTS:
Tohono O'odham Nation
P.O. Box 837
Sells, AZ 85634
520-383-2028; fax: 520-383-3379
www.tonation-nsn.gov
SOURCES:
EndurHarv-1995, p. 159
WildPlanet-1995, p. 607
References in periodicals archive ?
Those Sonoran Desert roots are pervasive here in the town of Sells at the 62nd Tohono O'odham Nation Rodeo and Fair.