Taishan

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Taishan

(tī`shän`) or

Tai

(tī), peak, 5,069 ft (1,545 m) high, W Shandong prov., E China. Located in the homeland of Confucius, it is China's most sacred mountain. In ancient times it was believed that Taishan controlled the earthly fate of humanity. The peak is revered by Buddhists and Taoists and has long been the goal of pilgrimages; it has many temples and shrines. Taishan is also called Dongyue [eastern peak].
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A Toronto-based missionary of white heritage who lived for many years in China and spoke Toishan, the dialect of most Toronto residents of Chinese heritage, conducted his own survey of waitresses.
5, 1950, in Toishan, China, to Yue and Jean Chin Eng.
We tell the story of the Cantonese from Toishan and Zhongshan, rather clannish people who were among the first Chinese to immigrate to our area.
Since Portland has had a only small Chinese population, (2) its Chinese restaurants have had to cater to the taste of the general community by offering strictly "American" fare along with heavily Americanized Chinese food based loosely on the Cantonese cuisine familiar to the early Chinese immigrants who most frequently originated in or near the Toishan District of Kwangtung (Guangdong) Province in southeastern China.
He was born in the Toishan District of Kwangtung Province, China.
A Gold Mountain rhyme from Toishan quoted in "Xinning zazhi" (1949), excerpted from "The Chinese of America" exhibit, Chinese Historical Society of America (1)
When I was in Toishan, traveling with my fellow rooters, I felt that affirmation.
In the early 1980s, Mainland China (PRC) also began its own version, initially hosted by the counties of the so-called Szeyup (Siyi) region of Hoiping (Kaiping), Sunwui (Xinhui), Toishan (Taishan), and Yanping (Enping), points of origin for most of the pre-1950s population of Chinese in North America.