Topping


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topping

Angling part of a brightly-coloured feather, usually from a golden pheasant crest, used to top some artificial flies

Topping

 

a method of plant care that consists of removing the blossoms when they begin to bloom in order to achieve better leaf growth (for example, in tobacco growing).


Topping

 

a thin, strong layer used in multilayer structures in buildings to accept and transmit loads bearing on an underlying layer of thermal or acoustical insulation; occupants, stored material, and equipment bearing on roofs or floors are typical loads to be transmitted in this manner. When underlying layers are insufficiently rigid, topping is used to construct an even surface that facilitates installation of overlying layers, such as waterproof roof coverings or flooring. Topping may be either monolithic (sandcement mix, asphalt concrete, or similar composition) or prefabricated, in the form of thin (4–5 cm thick) slabs of gypsum cement or lightweight aggregate concrete.

topping

[′täp·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
The distillation of crude petroleum to remove the light fractions only; the unrefined distillate is called tops.
(civil engineering)
A layer of mortar placed over concrete to form a finishing surface on a floor, driveway, sidewalk, or curb.
(textiles)
A step in the dyeing process in which a dyed material is placed in a bath of another color.

topping

1. A layer of high-quality concrete or mortar placed to form a floor surface on a concrete base.
2. The mixture of marble chips and matrix which, when properly processed, produces a terrazzo surface.
References in classic literature ?
It is not to be wondered that we prisoners were all desirous enough to see these brave, topping gentlemen, that were talked up to be such as their fellows had not been known, and especially because it was said they would in the morning be removed into the press-yard, having given money to the head master of the prison, to be allowed the liberty of that better part of the prison.
The successful Yellow candidate for the borough of Old Topping, perhaps, feels no pursuant meditative hatred toward the Blue editor who consoles his subscribers with vituperative rhetoric against Yellow men who sell their country, and are the demons of private life; but he might not be sorry, if law and opportunity favored, to kick that Blue editor to a deeper shade of his favorite color.