Tostig


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Tostig

(tŏs`tĭg), d. 1066, earl of Northumbria; son of Earl Godwin of Wessex. He was banished with his father in 1051 and returned with him in their armed invasion of 1052. Made earl of Northumbria in 1055, Tostig jointly invaded (1063) Wales with his brother Harold (later King HaroldHarold,
1022?–1066, king of England (1066). The son of Godwin, earl of Wessex, he belonged to the most powerful noble family of England in the reign of Edward the Confessor. Through Godwin's influence Harold was made earl of East Anglia.
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 of England). The Northumbrians revolted against Tostig's severe rule in 1065 and chose Morcar, brother of the earl of Mercia, to be their earl. Tostig fled to Flanders. The next year he raided the English coast, then joined the Norwegian king Harold IIIHarold III
or Harold Hardrada
, Norse Harald Harðráði [Harold stern council], d. 1066, king of Norway (1046–66), half-brother of Olaf II.
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 in defeating Morcar. Tostig and his ally were killed by Tostig's brother Harold at Stamford Bridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fulda Gospels, however, were illustrated in Flanders, where Judith took refuge after Tostig was driven out of Northumbria in 1065 and subsequently killed at Stamford Bridge while attempting to seize the throne from his brother, Harold.
El primer par es el que constituyen el conde Tostig, pretendiente del trono, y el rey noruego Harald Hardrada; es una complicidad de guerra, una alianza fiel pero ocasional contra un enemigo comun.
14) The following example from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle may illustrate this point: whereas MS C shows split coordination of the subject Tostig and his wif, the renderings of the same passage in MSS D and E present phrasal coordination:
Tostig and Hardraade joined forces and invaded England the same month, but were defeated and killed by Harold at Stamford Bridge, near York, on September 25.
Loyal Tostig fought on throughout the rest of the day, even after being offered a second chance at peace.
62) For an account of Judith's marriage to Tostig in the volatile years leading to the Norman Conquest, see Richard Fletcher, Bloodfeud (Oxford U.
Sir, - With reference to the letter by Mr Hurley (Post, Jul 21), his suggestion that the attacks on England by Tostig and William were co-ordinated is most likely correct.
The corresponding group of Godwin's children marry and have children themselves, as Harold and Tostig did.
This action reminds us of one of Borges's favorite historic moments: Icelandic historian Snorri Sturluson's account of the battle between Earl Tostig and his brother the King of England, Harold Godwinson.
It would seem that he played a leading part in the Norman victory at Hastings, for he was rewarded with wide estates in the south of England that had belonged to the highest figures in the old order, such as Harold himself and his brother Tostig.
The earl and his wife with Swein and two of the younger sons, Tostig and Gurth, took ship from Bosham for Flanders.
The consequences were far-reaching and Tostig decided to join forces against his brother with Viking Harald Hardrada to try and steal the crown for himself.