Toynbee


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Related to Toynbee: Toynbee Hall, Toynbee maneuver

Toynbee

1. Arnold 1852--83, British economist and social reformer, after whom Toynbee Hall, a residential settlement in East London, is named
2. his nephew, Arnold Joseph. 1889--1975, British historian. In his chief work, A Study of History (1934--61), he attempted to analyse the principles determining the rise and fall of civilizations
References in periodicals archive ?
Toynbee sharpened my fear that we are heading for the most unequal Britain in decades.
Toynbee and Brooks, along with many others, have gone beyond the crisis of British-American relations and beyond threats of a strike on Syria, to look into the state of affairs of the two empires.
They are also facing curfews from 10pm to 6am, according to Toynbee Hall.
Toynbee is President of the British Humanist Association which describes one of its core values as "engaging in debate rationally, intelligently and with attention to evidence.
The world of Auberon Waugh," wrote Toynbee, "is a coterie of reactionary fogeys centred on the Spectator and the Telegraph":
British historian and philosopher Arnold Joseph Toynbee (1889-1975) probably stands higher than any of his predecessors or contemporaries in documenting the 'History of Man'.
Toynbee, en el primer volumen de su estudio, sostenia que la conjuncion de dos fuerzas poderosas extendidas por casi todo el planeta, la industrializacion y el nacionalismo, habia moldeado la historia de Occidente.
Entonces vio a Toynbee por vez primera; pero pudo conocerlo mas detenidamente luego, dos anos mas tarde, en una estadia de investigacion en Chatham House, el Instituto de Estudios Internacionales del que Toynbee era, por esos anos, Director Emerito en Londres.
James Naughtie will present a special edition of Radio 4's book programme, with Sarah Hall and a small group of readers discussing her novel The Carhullan Army, while Polly Toynbee and David Walker will talk about Labour's longest term in office and whether it changed Britain.
Harold Temperley and James Butler from Cambridge, Alfred Zimmern and Arnold Toynbee from Oxford, Charles Webster from Liverpool and their counterparts from Harvard or Columbia had been recruited by their governments to advise on shaping the post-First World War world.
They would include Polly Toynbee, Shami Chakrabarti (Director of Liberty), Ann Pettifor (New Economics Foundation) and, of course, our own Debbie Abrahams.