Traditional neighborhood development


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Traditional neighborhood development

A development that is based on human-scale design for comfortable walking and may include such elements as alleys, streets laid out in a grid system, buildings oriented to the street, front porches on houses, pedestrian orientation, compatible and mixed luses, and village squares.
References in periodicals archive ?
But things are changing in many progressive cities and towns across the States, with a shift towards creating traditional neighborhood developments.
One of the hallmarks of Traditional Neighborhood Development is density.
Traditional neighborhood developments (TNDs) are a response to new urbanist philosophies.
While the Urban Infill Tier accommodated two types of Communities (Neighborhoods and Downtowns), the Greenfield Tier has a different Sector Plan for each of the three Communities: Hamlets are regulated by the Conservation Land Development ("CLD") Tier; Villages by the Traditional Neighborhood Development ("TND") Tier; and Town Centers by the Transit Oriented Development ("TOD") Tier.
Traditional neighborhood developments, which are sometimes referred to as new urbanism, started gaining momentum in the 1990s.
New Urbanists also assail the oceanic standards for parks, recreational areas, and school grounds that force the construction and maintenance of park space that is much too large for traditional neighborhood development.
These are the great old towns Duany turns to for examples of traditional neighborhood development.
is offering the new Web-based homes at the Village at Tinker Creek, a $60 million, 170-unit traditional neighborhood development he's building on 50 acres in Roanoke County, just a few miles north of the city of Roanoke.
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