injury

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Related to Traumatic brain injury: Mild traumatic brain injury

injury

Law a violation or infringement of another person's rights that causes him harm and is actionable at law

injury

[′in·jə·rē]
(medicine)
A structural or functional stress or trauma that induces a pathologic process.
Damage resulting from the stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of rehabilitation following mild traumatic brain injury.
However, after a period of 15 years, the risk of dementia diagnosis was found increased by about 80 per cent in those who had at least one traumatic brain injury compared to those who did not have one.
11) Traumatic brain injury appears to be a very strong risk factor for the development of PTSD.
Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, can result from a variety of causes, including car accidents, falls, combat-related incidents and sports injuries, leaving many survivors with life-long motor deficits.
The QBRI team will focus on deciphering cellular and biochemical changes that occur in responses to traumatic brain injury and work closely with the UMC team to combine this information with brain imaging data to elucidate the molecular pathways that modulate brain cells damage and recovery," said Dr Ali.
A review of the Traumatic Brain Injury products under development by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources
That's worth saying again: people who've had a mild traumatic brain injury usually do not get knocked out.
Previous studies show the rate of traumatic brain injury among adolescents who are not incarcerated is about 15 percent to 30 percent, said Dr.
The catastrophic effects of traumatic brain injury are presented through a series of interviews with athletes, members of the military, and health professionals, as well as through historical anecdotes.
Social and Communication Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition
Return-to-play" laws, such as Ohio's, which bans athletes from returning to play on the same day they've been removed because of a traumatic brain injury and prohibits coaches from allowing students to return to practice or competition without a doctor's approval, among other measures;

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