injury

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Related to Traumatic brain injury: Mild traumatic brain injury

injury

Law a violation or infringement of another person's rights that causes him harm and is actionable at law

injury

[′in·jə·rē]
(medicine)
A structural or functional stress or trauma that induces a pathologic process.
Damage resulting from the stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan the "signature wound" was traumatic brain injury.
After adjusting for factors that can affect stroke risk, such as age, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, as well as other disorders such as heart disease and the severity of the trauma, the researchers found that people with traumatic brain injury were 30 percent more likely to develop a stroke than those with trauma with no brain injury.
Traumatic brain injury occurs when an external force such as a bump, blow or jolt to the head disrupts the normal function of the brain.
We are developing a first-of-its-kind 'lab on a chip' as well as associated handheld instrumentation to revolutionize the way military and civilian medics diagnose and treat traumatic brain injury.
Although VA data show that 63 percent of servicemembers with traumatic brain injury were approved for TSGLI, the actual approval rate may be lower, and DOD and VA lack assurance that claim decisions are accurate, consistent, and timely within and across the branches of service.
A common myth is that young children recover better from traumatic brain injury than do older children or adults because the developing brain is more "plastic" - that unaffected areas in the brain will compensate for the injured ones.
Military personnel are not the only individuals at risk for traumatic brain injury caused by concussions.
Persons with traumatic brain injury who have low perceptions of quality of life often experience feelings of guilt, failure, and unhappiness, which may lead to depression (Fisher, 2005).
It bridges the gaps in short--and long--term memory caused by her traumatic brain injury, or TBI.
Children with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) face many challenges when moving from the rehabilitation to school setting.
One of the most challenging cases for a trial attorney involves representing a client with mild traumatic brain injury.
Brainlash provides the tools and facts to make the recovery process more intelligible and to support the wide range of people affected by mild traumatic brain injury.

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