Tree Snakes


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Related to Tree Snakes: Brown tree snake

Tree Snakes

 

several related genera of snakes of the subfamily Colubrinae. Length, 1 to 1.5 m. Ventral scales on the sides of the body form a clearly defined rib. Tree snakes are predominantly yellow, green, and black with a metallic sheen. They are found in tropical and southern Africa, South America, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, and northern Australia. Active during the day, tree snakes are incredibly quick and agile as they crawl through trees and shrubbery; many can jump distances of more than 1 m from branch to branch. Tree snakes feed on frogs, five species in Southeast Asia and Indonesia best known are the bronze tree snake of the genus Ahaetulla, which includes ten species in Southeast Asia, Indonesia, and northern Australia, and the flying snake of the genus Chrysopelea, which comprises five species in South-east Asia and Indonesia.

References in periodicals archive ?
Each mouse will sport a long streamer designed to intertwine with branches, delivering a delectable meal to the tree snake.
Geological Survey, said that the mice will be attached to green streamers, which will hook into the trees where the brown tree snakes like to eat their prey.
Brown tree snakes, believed to have been inadvertently carried to Guam around the end of World War Two aboard US military vessels, have become major pests blamed for wiping out native bird populations on the island.
D) to describe what Guam was like before the brown tree snakes arrived
Evidently acetaminophen--that's right, common, household pain reliever--is fatal to brown tree snakes.
The venomous brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis) is a member of the Boiginae sub-family within the polyphyletic taxon Colubridae, and native to tropical Africa, India, and Australia (1).
Hooded headed cobras to small bright green tree snakes, they all passed silently through the garden.
95) discusses invasive species, from killer toads to brown tree snakes, using the Great Lakes and Lake Victoria regions as examples of how invaders impact ecosystems and change or destroy biodiversity.
About 100 Guam rails are currently housed in a 60-acre sanctuary on Guam, which is fenced in to protect the birds from the brown tree snakes and an increasing population of feral cats.
Fatal mycotic dermatitis in captive brown tree snakes (Boiga irregularis).
On either end of the trap is a small narrow opening, large enough for brown tree snakes to enter, but funnel shaped to prevent them from getting out.
Brown tree snakes have gobbled their way through the island's bird species, bitten babies and tangled up in power lines, causing frequent electric blowouts at a cost of $4 million in damages annually.