White Poplar

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Related to Trembling aspen: balsam poplar

White Poplar

 

(Populus alba), a tree of the family Salicaceae having white tomentose leaves and young shoots. Other poplar species having white tomentose leaves are also called white poplars.

white poplar

traditional symbol of time. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 178]
See: Time
References in periodicals archive ?
The notably high bulk density of HB2-PC-T0-P0 may be partially attributed to its having sugar maple as its major species composition versus trembling aspen for HB1-CC-T0-P0 and HB3-CCT0-P0.
Several small stands of trembling aspen occur on an abandoned gravel pad that was the site of the decommissioned Alyeska Toolik Camp at the abandoned site of the University Toolik Camp near the current location of the Toolik Field Station in the northern foothills of the Brooks Range (Fig.
Therefore, the development of yield and growth for trembling aspen stands is obviously needed.
Deterioration of trembling aspen clones in the Great Lakes Region.
2009b) compared the performance of strand boards made from trembling aspen to those made from paper birch.
Single-tree equations for estimating biomass of trembling aspen, largetooth aspen and white birch in Ontario.
The possibility of manufacturing particleboards with black spruce and trembling aspen bark and a synthetic adhesive was demonstrated by Blanchet et al.
Key words: bark colour, white birch, cambium temperatures, trembling aspen, sunscald, boreal forest, deciduous trees
Much concern has been expressed in recent decades that trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.
Miller] advance regeneration in even-aged trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.
The results showed that, while the mechanical properties of the PB made from extracted black spruce and trembling aspen bark decreased with increasing bark content, LE increased.
Professor Terry Gillespie at the University of Guelph says poplars, trembling aspens, willows, sycamores, and Scotch pines are the worst offenders.