Tricoteuses


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Tricoteuses

sobriquet of battle-exhorting women at French Convention. [Fr. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1100]
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beaucoup moins que]Le manque de couturieres et de tricoteuses a fait que les merceries n'arrivent plus a faire vivre leurs proprietaires et ce ne sont pas les generations montantes qui vont prendre la releve pour perpetuer ce metier[beaucoup plus grand que], s'est plaint ce vendeur.
In her husband's self-defence, in the same magazine's issue of March 19, 2007, he characterized his detractors as "braying, hideous tricoteuses," casting himself as a hapless aristo losing his head while the citoyens of the French Revolution did their ominous knitting.
Watt identifies the multiplicity of historical and literary associations pervading the scene in the anteroom, two of which are "the French tricoteuses callously knitting at the guillotine, and the Roman crowds to whom the gladiators address their scornful farewell.
The knitting outsider, a threatening presence in her observant post at the edges of the group is reminiscent of the tricoteuses of the French Revolution and thus represents women who venture outside the domestic sphere; and the mother with her inanimate bundle evokes either postpartum psychosis or infanticide, two forms of dysfunctional maternal behavior.
Hostile responses in which it was claimed that groups of women epitomized unruliness, viciousness, and insanity were associated with the women participants of the October marches, the women in revolutionary clubs, and the tricoteuses.
Knitting incessantly while watching the daily executions at the guillotine, she is a perfect example of the tricoteuses.
Les tricoteuses qui realisaient des merveilles grace a leur savoir-faire ont vraisemblablement d'autres preoccupations ou ont opte pour d'autres activites.
WHERE were the tricoteuses said to sit in the French Revolution?