tripartite

(redirected from Tripartition)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

tripartite

(esp of leaves) consisting of three parts formed by divisions extending almost to the base
References in periodicals archive ?
See Timaeus 89d-90d where tripartition is explicitly said to be the burden of embodiment.
Cette tripartition enonciative se retrouve egalement dans Adam (1997, 2005) et Adam, Lugrin et Revaz (1998), sous la forme schematique suivante :
Ce tableau souligne que l'opposition enonciative initiale de Benveniste cache une tripartition qui tient compte d'un croisement entre un critere enonciatif (position enonciative) et critere narratologique (diegetisation) : une diegetisation autonome << enonciation historique >>, une diegetisation liee (enonciation discursive) et l'interaction directe (enonciation discursive).
This tripartition can be observed for both values of external proportionality in the table in (11).
The present proportionality--driven ordering is to be preferred in that it yields a more balanced subclassification consisting of six cases of oneto-one correspondence, two bipartitions, and one tripartition.
The tripartition has been arrived at on the basis of the meaning and (especially ritual) implications of the verses.
225-6) and an appendix, "Socratic Psychology or Tripartition in the Symposium?
La tripartition est purement formelle et repose sur le nombre des gouvernants"; Pierre Aubenque, "Aristote et la Democratie," in Aristote Politique: Etudes sur la Politique d' Aristote, 255-64, esp.
Sextus Empiricus and the Tripartition of Time, JAMES WARREN
A discussion of the arguments against the existence of time based upon its tripartition into past, present, and future found in SE M 10.
On that view, by the time we finish book 7 we will have traversed the longer road, and therefore will have learned the truth about justice, and we can be reasonably sure that the soul really is tripartite since tripartition is not repudiated there and reason continues to be set in opposition to appetite and spiritedness (for example 469d-e).
The second, derived from the Platonic tripartition of the soul, maintains that as movements of a separate, irrational part of the soul, the passions can only be modified through nonrational means.