Tripitaka


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Tripitaka

 

(in Pali, Tipitaka; the word means “three baskets”), a collection of Buddhist texts written in the Pali language and also known as the Pali canon. The tenets of the Tripitaka were set forth at the first Buddhist council, held in Rajagriha in the fifth century B.C. The definitive redaction was established at the third Buddhist council, held in Pataliputra in the third century B.C. The work was first written down in 80 B.C. in Ceylon.

The Tripitaka is a collection of works by various authors and from diverse periods. It combines philosophical and psychological discourses and ethical maxims with folktales, legends, and parables. The original tenets of Buddhism contained in the Tripitaka have been altered over the course of history, in particular, through the editing of the adherents of the Theravada school. Nevertheless, in terms of completeness and authenticity the work is the principal source for the study of early Buddhism; only individual parts and fragments of the canons of other ancient sects have survived. The Tripitaka also contains valuable information about the economic, social, and ideological life of ancient India.

Tripitaka

the ethical and doctrinal teachings of Buddha. [Buddhism: Haydn & Fuller, 759]
References in periodicals archive ?
There the work coordinating the BDK English Tripitaka Series Project was started by Rev.
25) What is not clear, then, is whether or not this work, which was highly regarded in Zen circles in East Asia, was included in the many copies of the Tripitaka that had reached Japan already.
Tripitaka, the Buddhist scripture, includes over 18,000 discourses and around 84,000 stories of Gautam Buddha.
MONKEY BUSINESS: The four main characters (from left) Sandy, Monkey, Tripitaka and Pigsy
Neil Callan, who was suspended for two days (January 17-18) for allowing the winner to hang, told Nunn that Tripitaka remained on the upgrade.
On the all-weather at Kempton course specialist TRIPITAKA (3.
In Theravada Buddhism there are the Tripitaka which is the collection of teaching from the Buddha and his immediate disciples.
The syncretic nature of these religions is found in the Tripitaka (Ta Tsang) in words of the Buddhist Master Ssu of the Southern Sacred Mountain who was the teacher of Chhen Te-An, founder of the Tien-Tai sect of Buddhism.
The thirty-two picture essays and charts inserted in the chapters provide images and detailed information about some important cultural achievements and artifacts of Korea, including the gold decoration from the funerary headwear of King Muryong from the Three Kingdoms period, the pagodas at Pulguk-sa built in the eighth century, printing blocks for the Korean Tripitaka made in the thirteenth century, an inlaid celadon jar produced in the twelfth or thirteenth century, and a wooden mask from the fourteenth or fifteenth century.
Monkey (Che Varley) is joined by the priest Tripitaka (Katherine Morley), Pigsy (Ian McGuire) and the water-demon Sandy (Lucy Price).
From the Tripitaka to the Torah, Satnam to Allah, resurrection to reincarnation, ahimsa to charity, and rabbi to bishop, the diversity of religious beliefs and practices is striking.
The Sutras of the Buddha do not refer directly to divorce, nor does the Tripitaka.