Trojan horse


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Related to Trojan horse: Trojan War

Trojan Horse

1. Greek myth the huge wooden hollow figure of a horse left outside Troy by the Greeks when they feigned retreat and dragged inside by the Trojans. The men concealed inside it opened the city to the final Greek assault
2. Computing a bug inserted into a program or system designed to be activated after a certain time or a certain number of operations

Trojan horse

[‚trō·jən ′hȯrs]
(computer science)
A computer program that has an unannounced function in addition to a desirable apparent function.

Trojan Horse

hollow horse concealed soldiers, enabling them to enter and capture Troy. [Gk. Myth.: Iliad]
See: Deceit

Trojan horse

(application, security)
(Coined by MIT-hacker-turned-NSA-spook Dan Edwards) A malicious, security-breaking program that is disguised as something benign, such as a directory lister, archiver, game, or (in one notorious 1990 case on the Mac) a program to find and destroy viruses! A Trojan horse is similar to a back door.

See also RFC 1135, worm, phage, mockingbird.
References in periodicals archive ?
lt;B Peter Clarke investigated the Trojan Horse allegations for the city
This Trojan Horse arrived as an attachment to an e-mail message.
But speaking to the Birmingham Mail, she warned that existing disciplinary procedures for teachers accused of misconduct may not be suitable for dealing with complex cases such as those seen in Trojan Horse.
e academy in Alum Rock in Birmingham has been the focus of allegations made in the Trojan Horse investigation.
A Trojan horse, has been found on pornographic web sites.
The spam campaign was discovered on 18 April by Sophos, which identified the Trojan horse as Mal/Packer which attempts to steal usernames, passwords and other information from online bankers.
A Trojan horse is a seemingly legitimate computer program that has been intentionally designed to disrupt and damage compute--activity.
Sophos said the e-mail containing the Stinx-N Trojan horse has been received by university students in the UK and US to date.
When the Trojan Horse virus hit handheld devices shortly before Labor Day weekend, it was cause for concern.
The cell then readily embraces the bacterium as something it thinks it wants, when in effect it's taking in a Trojan horse.