Trophonius


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Trophonius

(trəfō`nēəs), in Greek mythology, famous architect. He and his brother Agamedes built the temple of Apollo at Delphi and the treasury of King Hyrieus. According to one legend, Trophonius was swallowed up by the earth at Lebadea in Boeotia, which became the site of a famous subterranean oracle.
References in classic literature ?
are unknown to the writer of the hymn, 2) the temple built by Trophonius and Agamedes for Apollo (ll.
When [the tragic philosopher] appears in the sixth and fifth centuries, among the enormous dangers and temptations and increasing secularization, walking as it were out of the cave of Trophonius straight into the midst of the lavish luxuriance, the pioneer freedom, the wealth and sensuality of the Greek colonies, we may suspect that he comes, a distinguished warning voice, to express the same purpose of which the Orphic mysteries hint in the grotesque hieroglyphics of their rites.
Farnell, among those who received these honours the following sub-groups can be discerned: 'heroes of divine or daimonic origin' (such as Trophonius, Linus, Ino-Leucothea); 'sacral heroes' (Aineias, Iphigeneia, Amphiaraus, Melampous); 'functional heroes', whose names are in fact nothing more than appellative epithets; and also Heracles, the Dioscuroi, Asclepius, each of whom is taken as a category in his own right; the heroes of the Homeric epics; and, finally, historical figures who became objects of a hero-cult.
The friend declares that he is unwilling to descend with the author into the dark cave of Trophonius, "there to rub my own eyes, in order to make the sparks and figured flashes, which I am required to see" (I.
The oracle of Trophonius, in Boeotia, was perhaps the most awesome.
Trophonius is celebrated in Greek legend as the builder of the temple of Apollo at Delphi.