tubeworms

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Related to Tube worm: tapeworm, Siboglinid

tubeworms

[′tüb‚wərmz]
(invertebrate zoology)
Marine polychaete worms (particularly many species in the family Serpulidae) which construct permanent calcareous tubes on rocks, seaweeds, dock pilings, and ship bottoms. The individual tubes with hard walls of calcite-aragonite, ranging from 0.04 to 0.4 inch (1 millimeter to 1 centimeter) in diameter and from 0.16 to 4 inches (4 millimeters to 10 centimeters) in length, are firmly cemented to a hard substrate and to each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
Absence of cospeciation in deep-sea vestimentiferan tube worms and their bacterial endosymbionts.
The larvae of some tube worms that attach themselves to the seafloor around hydrothermal vents can't stand the heat there.
Inorganic carbon and temperature requirements for autotrophic carbon fixation by the chemoautotrophic symbionts of the giant hydrothermal vent tube worm, Riftia pachyptila.
Molecular systematics of deep-sea tube worms (Vestimentifera).
Caption: Hydrothermal vents, and associated deep-sea ecosystems (giant tube worms, shown), are more abundant than scientists thought.
Look for rockpiles, pilings, riprap around seawalls and docks to hold sheepies as they feed on tiny crabs, shrimp, tube worms and barnacles.
By disrupting the growth of micro fouling organisms, the beginning of the fouling food chain, growth of barnacles, tube worms, and other macro marine fouling growth are discouraged keeping the hull, running gear and ray water inlets clear of fouling.
On the surface I have found common fossils of clams, gastropods, shrimp tunnels and tube worms.
In addition to the tube worms, which so far have been seen only in the Pacific, there are other denizens of the vents.
Follow-up inspections have shown that pseudo reefs sunk last year are supporting health algae, barnacles, and tube worms amid a sweeping array of fish and invertebrates now calling the seafloor structures home.
In addition to tube worms, the team documented deep-sea fish, mussels, clam beds and high densities of crabs.
In February 2011, Salon reported that scientist Samantha Joye of the University of Georgia found sea floors in the Gulf that were still coated with oil from the spill--and oil-choked sea creatures including dead crabs, tube worms and brittle stars littered the ocean floor.