Tufted Deer


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Tufted Deer

 

(Elaphodus cephalophus), an artiodactyl ruminant of the family Cervidae. The body is 110–160 cm long and 50–70 cm tall; the tail is 7–15 cm long. The weight is 17–50 kg. The antlers are short and sometimes almost concealed by a frontal tuft of long hairs. The upperpart of the body is chocolate brown; the underpart is lighter in coloration. The tips of the ears and the lower part of the tail are white. Tufted deer are distributed in shrub-covered mountains of southern China, northern Burma, and Laos. They live in couples or singly. Their diet consists of grass. Mating occurs in April or May; the gestation period is about six months. There are one or two young in a litter.

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Born on December 6, 2017, Jack is yet another success story for the zoo's breeding programmes, which has already seen the birth of two endangered snow leopard twins, two critically endangered orangutans, a northern whitecheeked gibbon and a Michie's tufted deer fawn, to name a few, all of which were born at Twycross during 2017.
Other births to endangered species at the zoo this year included snow leopard twins, a northern white-cheeked gibbon and a Michie's tufted deer fawn.
A RARE tufted deer is the latest arrival at Twycross Zoo.
Tufted deer are territorial animals, most active at dawn and dusk.
The second new arrival now on public view is Ying Xiong - pronounced ying yong - the new rare Tufted deer.
Mother, Michelle, and father, Mitch, are taking good care of the youngster which zoo staff named after the Chinese word for hero - as tufted deer are originally from China.
TWYCROSS Zoo, near Nuneaton, has two new additions to its collection - western tufted deer which are the first of their kind in the country.
Western tufted deer are coloured like their parents but have a row of spots on each side of their back.