tulipomania

(redirected from Tulip mania)
Also found in: Dictionary, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to Tulip mania: Tulipomania

tulipomania

tulip craze in Holland during which fortunes were lost. [Eur. Hist.: WB, 19: 394]
See: Fads
References in periodicals archive ?
The tulip mania speculation of 1637 or the outrageous promises of extravagant returns on new trading company investments that resulted in the Bubble Act of 1720 reveal the dangers of overpriced commodities.
Much later it was appropriated by Western Europe and the Netherlands in the 17th century where it ostensibly turned into a symbol of capitalism as Tulip Mania spread all over Europe.
Perhaps, in the end, they are only curiosities, like the tulip mania that seized the Dutch people in the seventeenth century.
Vogel begins with an overview of historical episodes of asset price bubbles, including the Dutch tulip mania of the 1600s, the South Sea and Mississippi bubbles of the 1700s, the U.
Armitage writes, AoPassion for dahlias in the 1840s matched the tulip mania of the seventeenth century.
The articles go far beyond the evaluation of a collection to give a picture of European intellectual culture caught between science and magic, brave new worlds and tulip mania.
As Lehrer notes, from the tulip mania of 17th-century Holland, in which 12 acres of valuable land were offered for a single bulb, to the South Sea Bubble of 18th-century England, in which a cheerleading press spurred a dramatic spike in the value of a debt-ridden slave-trading company, Mackay demonstrates that "every age has its peculiar folly.
But although the famous Dutch Tulip mania is a thing of the distant past - when Turkish merchants were flush with cash the way oil-drenched Russians are now - the bulbs show no sign of losing their popularity.
Greenspan's choice has generated riches beyond mankind's wildest dreams; Stiglitz's approach would prevent the emergence of stock bubbles that, since the tulip mania in Holland nearly four centuries ago up to the most recent Internet fever, have turned illusions of splendor into a nightmare.
IT IS almost certain that the Great Technology Bubble of the late 1990s will rate alongside the great manias of history -the South Sea Bubble, Tulip Mania and the Roaring 20s to name the most obvious examples.