Tungurahua


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Tungurahua

[Quechua,=throat of fire], snow-capped volcano, 16,479 ft (5,203 m) high, central Ecuador, c.85 mi (135 km) SE of Quito. Its eruptions typically occur at intervals of 80 to 100 years. In the 20th cent., it erupted from 1916 to 1918, with minor activity continuing until 1925. Tungurahua was then quiet until a large eruption in 1999, and it has erupted periodically since then.
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Tungurahua, [1[degrees]28'S, 78[degrees]26'W], Dec.
THE Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador has spewed a sixmile column of ash into the air after a powerful, fiveminute explosion.
Activity has been building at the Tungurahua volcano 130 kilometers south of the capital Quito since early February, and on Friday experts reported a loud explosion "that lasted for five minutes" and an expulsion of ash.
QUITO, Ecuador, Rabi'II 2, 1435, Feb 2, 2014, SPA -- Ecuador's Geophysics Institute is reporting that the Tungurahua volcano has erupted three times, spewing ash and lava in what it called an important increase in activity, AP reported.
QUITO (CyHAN)- The authorities of Ecuador began evacuating people from villages located near the country's Tungurahua volcano, local media reported on Sunday.
AUTHORITIES in Ecuador have sent health experts to communities near the Tungurahua volcano to help residents affected by the constantly-falling ash.
Tungurahua, Carchi, and Imbabura Provinces reported only occasional malaria cases (Figure 5).
Summary: Volcanologists have warned residents near Ecuador's Tungurahua volcano to evacuate following the start of another eruption.
THE Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador is billowing ash into the sky and sending super-hot pyroclastic flows surging down its slopes, causing authorities to evacuate nearby villages.
Salasaca is an indigenous parish of 12,000 Quichu-speaking people in the Andean province of Tungurahua, Ecuador.
In the second volcanic eruption in Latin America on Friday, loud explosions shook the ground and rattled windows near the volcano known as Tungurahua in the indigenous Quechua language, 130 km (81 miles) southeast of Quito, officials said.
Explosions rocked Ecuador's Tungurahua volcano (left), forcing the evacuations of hundreds of people from nearby villages.