Turks and Caicos Islands

(redirected from Turks islands)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Turks and Caicos Islands

(kī`kōs), dependency of Great Britain (2015 est. pop. 34,000), 166 sq mi (430 sq km), West Indies. There are more than 30 cays and islands, of which eight are inhabited. Geographically, the islands are a southeastern continuation of the BahamasBahamas, the
, officially Commonwealth of the Bahamas, independent nation (2015 est. pop. 387,000), 4,403 sq mi (11,404 sq km), in the Atlantic Ocean, consisting of some 700 islands and islets and about 2,400 cays, beginning c.50 mi (80 km) off SE Florida and extending c.
..... Click the link for more information.
. The capital is at Cockburn TownCockburn Town,
town (1990 pop. 350), capital of the British dependency of the Turks and Caicos Islands, located on Grand Turk Island, on the Turks Island Passage. The port town is the islands' administrative, commercial, and cultural center.
..... Click the link for more information.
 on Grand Turk. Lobster and conch are primary exports; the economic mainstays are tourism and offshore financial services. There is also an underground economy based on the transportation of illegal drugs. For nearly three centuries (until the 1960s), salt production was the islands' main industry. The population is largely of African descent; Protestantism is the main religion and English is spoken. The islands are governed under a constitution that came into effect in 2012; direct rule was imposed by Britain from 2009 to 2012 due to evidence of corruption, dishonesty, and administrative incompetence under the previous constitution. There is a unicameral 20-seat House of Assembly with 15 elected members (5 at large and 10 from constituencies), 4 appointed members, and the attorney general, all of whom serve four-year terms. The government is headed by a premier, and the monarch of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, represented by a governor, is the head of state. The islands were first visited by Europeans in 1512 when Ponce de LeónPonce de León, Juan
, c.1460–1521, Spanish explorer, first Westerner to reach Florida. He served against the Moors of Granada, and in 1493 he accompanied Columbus on his second voyage to America.
..... Click the link for more information.
 landed there; they were a dependency of Jamaica until that island's independence in 1962. The islands suffered significant damage from Hurricane Irma in 2017.
References in periodicals archive ?
To document this "unbounded illicit Trade," Thomas Shirley, now governor of the Bahamas, submitted a list of vessels trading at Turks Islands during the twelve-month period from early March 1769 to mid-February 1770.
It seems that the King's Agent and other residents of the Turks Islands were amenable to including slaves in their freewheeling trade with and among Bermudan, Spanish, French, and British ships.
Governor Shirley's 1770 report and correspondence between Shirley and the Earl of Hillsborough, Symmer and Hillsborough, and "his Majesty's Industrious Subjects" on Turks Islands clearly reveal that Shirley and the government of the Bahamas were determined to force Turks Islanders to comply with Bahamian laws, notably new salt pond regulations, prohibitions on trade in goods other than salt, and the collection of export taxes on salt.
That may be true because in 1775 and 1776, the Continental Congress permitted provisions to be exported to the Turks Islands in return for salt.
The importance of Turks Islands salt would only increase over the final decades of the eighteenth century and into the next century.
Consul to Turks Islands, Thomas Wynn, was reporting in to the "Honorable Martin Van Buren, Secretary of State.
Gregory, The Turks Islands Salt Trade and Industry: An Historical Economic Geography (Berkeley: University of California, 1970), 1-4.
Andrew Symmer, Turks Islands, to "My Lord" [Earl of Hillsborough], 27 June 1768.
Sadler, Turks Islands Landfall: A History of the Turks & Caicos Islands (1967; Kingston, Jamaica: United Cooperative Printers, Ltd.
On Shirley's argument in support of British sovereignty over the Turks Islands, see Governor W.
Regarding competition over Turks Islands salt: in 1629, Charles I had included the Bahamas in a land grant to his attorney-general Sir Robert Heath.
Rules & Orders for regulating His Majesty's Ponds on Turks Islands & for maintaining Peace & good Order amongst the Inhabitants .
Full browser ?