Thutmose III

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Related to Tuthmosis III: Hatshepsut, Ramses II, Tutankhamun

Thutmose III

(thŭt`mōz, tŭt`–) or

Thothmes III

(thŏth`mēz, tōt`mĕs), d. 1436 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; the successor of Thutmose IIThutmose II
or Thothmes II
, reigned c.1495–1490 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, fourth ruler of the XVIII dynasty and the son and successor of Thutmose I. Unlike Hatshepsut, his half-sister whom he married, Thutmose II did not have a royal mother.
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. After the death of Thutmose II, his wife HatshepsutHatshepsut
, d. 1458 B.C., ruler of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; eldest daughter of Thutmose I. She managed to rule Egypt by relegating her husband (and younger half-brother), Thutmose II, to the background during his brief reign.
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 became regent for Thutmose III and relegated him to an inferior position for 22 years while she ruled Egypt. At her death (1468 B.C.), he emerged as the sole ruler of Egypt and as a great conqueror. Almost immediately he advanced into Syria, where an Asian alliance against Egypt waited to oppose him. He was victor at MegiddoMegiddo
, city, ancient Palestine, by the Kishon River on the southern edge of the plain of Esdraelon, N of Samaria, located at present-day Tel Megiddo, SE of Haifa, Israel, near modern Megiddo. It was inhabited from the 7th millennium B.C. to c.450 B.C.
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 and consolidated all Syria, except Phoenicia, in his empire. In successive campaigns he reduced every ruler N of the Euphrates to the status of autonomous tributary and eventually conquered even powerful KadeshKadesh
, ancient city of Syria, on the Orontes River. There Ramses II fought (c.1300 B.C.) the Hittites in a great battle that ended in a truce.
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 and MitanniMitanni
, ancient kingdom established in the 2d millennium B.C. in NW Mesopotamia. It was founded by Aryans but was later made up predominantly of Hurrians. Washshukanni was its capital.
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, a kingdom E of the Euphrates River. His empire (the zenith of the New Empire), extending from the Third Cataract to the Euphrates, was used to enrich Egypt with wealth and manpower. He built temples up and down the Nile and founded the wealth of the priesthood of Amon, to which he belonged. Thutmose died after having made his son Amenhotep IIAmenhotep II
or Amenophis II
, d. c.1420 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; son and successor of Thutmose III. Amenhotep II succeeded (1448 B.C.) as coregent and later ruled alone for 26 years.
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 coregent, and was buried in the Valley of the Kings at Thebes. His mummy is now at Cairo.

Thutmose III

died c. 1450 bc, king of Egypt of the 18th dynasty, who completed the conquest of Syria and dominated the Middle East. He was also a patron of the arts and a famous athlete
References in periodicals archive ?
Tuthmosis III was only 9 when he became pharaoh, so Hatshepsut became the regent who would rule in her stepson's name until he was of age.
43) Both Augustus and Constantine considered bringing it to Rome from Thebes, where it had been erected by Pharaoh Tuthmosis III during the 15th century BC.
Images used that were not from the Horemheb tomb include that of the pharaoh Tuthmosis III (1504-1450 B.
For the adventurous, there is the limestone tomb of Tuthmosis III, hidden in a crevice at the back of the valley.
Las tecnicas de la dominacion imperial egipcia en Asia bajo Tuthmosis III.
Bahariya prospered under Tuthmosis III (ruled 1505 to 1451 BC), who brought Egypt's oases under control and appointed local governors.
Our 68 foot tribute to Tuthmosis III stands on the Thames Embankment.
From centuries later, the New Kingdom is represented at Wadi el-Hol by the prenomen of Tuthmosis III (WH35), the graffito of the Stable-master Pasaanuy (WH22), and most notably the formal epigraph (WH44) of the Second Prophet of Amun, Roma, almost certainly the famous later High Priest of Amun.
In fact, on plate 190 you find the wedge-shaped motif carved on the scabbard of a dagger worn on a statue of Tuthmosis III, where the Pharaoh's very belt is set with cartouches.
Her successor and, by rights, the true pharaoh, Tuthmosis III, was only a young man and preoccupied by the many war campaigns Hatshepsut had instigated to be bothered with the task of ruling.
She and Tuthmosis III were declared joint Pharaohs.
Consisting of Nakht (TT 52), Ramose (TT 55), Userhat (TT 56), Menna (TT 69), Sennefer (TT 96), and Rekhmire (TT 100), these tombs date from Tuthmosis III (TT 56 and 100) to Amenhotep IV (TT 55).