juvenile-onset diabetes

(redirected from type 1 diabetes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to type 1 diabetes: type 2 diabetes

juvenile-onset diabetes

[′jü·vən·əl ¦ȯn‚set ‚dī·ə′bēd·ēz]
(medicine)
A form of diabetes mellitus which develops early in life and presents much more severe symptoms than the more common maturity-onset diabetes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The analysts forecast the Global Type 1 Diabetes Market will grow at a CAGR of 6.
Type 1 diabetes develops when the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas,' said AIHW spokesperson Susana Senes.
Several groups of scientists are now studying whether a few days or weeks of antibody therapy, if given soon after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, can keep the disease from worsening.
In the Netherlands the incidence of type 1 diabetes among children 0-4 years old doubled between 1990 and 1995, and the overall incidence in children aged 0-14 years increased 32% between 1980 and 1995, from 11.
The study helps executives estimate Type 1 Diabetes market potential, assess unmet need, develop drug forecasting models, and build population-based health management frameworks.
Annualized seven key markets (US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK and Japan) Type 1 Diabetes Therapeutics market revenues data from 2005 to 2010, forecast for eight years to 2018.
Eisenbarth and his colleagues worked with mice genetically predisposed to develop type 1 diabetes even though the animals initially produce insulin.
It can be a pain having to deal with it,'' admits Hall, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 1999.
Type 1 Diabetes (Juvenile Diabetes) Therapeutics under Investigation by Universities/Institutes
To explore whether the timing of food introduction contributes to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes or celiac disease, researchers followed 1,610 German babies who had a family history of type 1 diabetes.
GlobalData has estimated the global type 1 diabetes therapeutics market to be valued at $2.
In time, these patients often require insulin injections, as people with type 1 diabetes do.