Typhlitis


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Typhlitis

 

(also cecitis), inflammation of the cecum. Typhlitis results from failure of the cecum to empty itself of its contents—for example, because of lengthening or prolapse of the intestine or in the case of a tumor—or because of prolonged retention and excessive fermentation or putrefaction of its contents. Less frequently, typhlitis is a complication of acute appendicitis occurring when the inflammation moves from the vermiform appendix to the intestinal wall. The symptoms of typhlitis are pain in the right abdomen, swelling of the cecum, alternating constipation and diarrhea, and increased body temperature. The condition may be acute or chronic. The patient’s stools, which are analyzed for diagnostic purposes, may contain mucus and sometimes pus and blood. Treatment is the same as for colitis. A spare diet and enemas are prescribed. Surgery is performed in some cases.

References in periodicals archive ?
Typhlitis as a complication of alemtuzumab therapy.
The symptoms do not fit the typical picture of necrotizing inflammation of the caecum typhlitis seen in leukemia patients (Lancet 355[9200]:281-83, 2000).
Appendicular abscess or mass, ileocaecal tuberculosis, carcinoma caecum, mesenteric adenitis, iliac nodes, typhlitis, Crohn's disease, actinomycosis, distended gallblader, ovarian cysts, fibroid uterus, tubo-ovarian mass, occasionally intussusception, amoeboma, diverticular disease.
Necropsy examination revealed congested liver, hypertrophied kidneys, peritonitis, severe typhlitis suggestive of coligranuloma, pneumonia, and airsacculitis, which are typical signs of colisepticemia.
The gastrointestinal system must also be carefully examined as typhlitis or neutropenic enterocolitis is a common cause of severe infection.
These opportunistic pathogens include mycobacteria (tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium intracellulare), viruses (CMV), parasites (Cryptosporidium) and, in the setting of neutropenia, typhlitis (neutropenic colitis, Figure 19).
On gross pathologic examination, the geese were found to have hemorrhagic-to-necrotic inflammation of the large intestine (colon and rectum) and fibrinonecrotic typhlitis accompanied by severe degeneration.
However, on day 12 neutropenic typhlitis developed, and a fight hemicolectomy was performed.