Typological Method

Typological Method

 

in archaeology, a method of systematic and chronological classifying of archaeological remains. The method, devised by G. O. Montelius, was first applied in European archaeology in the second half of the 19th century.

The typological method entails the classification of ancient objects—such as weapons, work implements, ornaments, or vessels—according to the materials and methods used in making them and according to their shape and ornamentation. Objects that have identical functions and are similar in appearance but differ in detail are grouped in typological evolutionary series; by comparing these series, one can identify groups of objects that are characteristic of a particular epoch. Typological series are also used in the classification of graves and other archaeological structures. The typological method is a valuable archaeological procedure.

References in periodicals archive ?
An additional step was taken by the Comte de Caylus in his 1752 Recueil d'Antiquites, when he defined rules of typological method in a way not far removed from the formulations of Pitt-Rivers or Montelius (Caylus 1752: vii-viii):
The second half of the book traces the dissolution of the figurative/ typological method in the course of the Middle Ages.
Sadly, the author's typological method is inconsistent and marred by impressionism.
Given the nature of Bordesian types and the typological method, however, it is very possible that the finer-scale morphological variability that we recognize today is, at least in part, an effect of our own analytic methods.