Tysiatskii

Tysiatskii

 

in ancient Russia, the military leader of a tysiacha (town militia). In the Novgorod Feudal Republic a tysiatskii was chosen at a veche (popular meeting) of boyars, usually for a term of one year, and served as an assistant to the posadnik (prince’s vicegerent). In cities without veche administration, princes appointed tysiatskie from the aristocratic boyars; the post then became hereditary. Prince Dmitrii Ivanovich Donskoi abolished the post of tysiatskii in Moscow. Elsewhere, voevody (military governors) and namestniki (vicegerents) replaced tysiatskie, and by the mid-15th century, the post was gradually disappearing.

REFERENCE

Tikhomirov, M. N. Srednevekovaia Moskva v XFV-XV vv. Moscow, 1957.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his absence, an aristocracy drawn from the most powerful local clans monopolized the elective offices of posadnik (mayor) and tysiatskii ("thousandman"), (2) sharing power with the veche, if not controlling it.
19) But during his nine-day visit to the city, Lannoy met other town officials (seigneurs, or "lords"), the tysiatskii (whom he called dux), and the posadnik (bourchgrave).
76) In 335, Vasilii paid for the construction of a wall around the Market Side of the city, in conjunction with the posadnik and tysiatskii.
While Novgorod's political constitution is ambiguous, the city government apparently comprised the posadniki (mayors), the tysiatskie (originally a single tysiatskii was head of the city militia, but later there were several tysiatskie, and the office became a judicial one), and the veche.
It also noted that "having deliberated much, the posadnik and the tysiatskii and all Novgorod and the abbots (hegumens) and priests decided not to make a choice for themselves by human means but decided to accept God's decision and to trust in His mercy, and let God designate whomever He and Holy Wisdom should desire.