UK Schmidt Telescope


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UK Schmidt Telescope

(UKST) The 1.2-meter Schmidt telescope at the Anglo-Australian Observatory, Australia. Since 1988 it has been run by the Anglo–Australian Telescope Board, having been originally administered by the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (ROE). The UKST began regular observation in 1973, and was involved primarily in the production of photographic plates for the ESO/SERC Southern Sky Survey. It can reach limiting magnitudes in exposures of about an hour as a result of its low focal ratio of f/2.5. Each photograph covers a very wide area of the sky, amounting to 40 square degrees (in fact 6.6 × 6.6 degrees), and gives images of arc-second resolution over a wavelength range of 340–1000 nm. Its photographs are held in the plate library of the ROE. See also COSMOS.
References in periodicals archive ?
2-meter UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, Australia, and Allan Sandage wrote about it and the scattering of optical light in 1975-76.
Beutler's work draws on data from a survey of more than 125,000 galaxies carried out with the UK Schmidt Telescope in eastern Australia.
This comet was discovered comparatively recently, in 1968, by Martin Hartley at the UK Schmidt Telescope unit in Australia.
Using a sequence of photographs of the southern celestial hemisphere taken by the UK Schmidt telescope at Siding Springs Observatory in New South Wales, Australia, the team picked out images of distant galaxies and discarded those of individual stars with the help of a computerized scanning machine.
2-meter (48-inch) UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia.
A nother comet-hunting team relies on high-quality photographic plates at the UK Schmidt telescope at Siding Springs Observatory, New South Wales, Australia.
Subsequently, similar clouds were found on plates obtained by David Malin with the UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia.
STScI has been digitizing the photographic Sky survey plates from the Palomar and UK Schmidt telescopes to produce the GSC and Digital Sky Survey (DSS).