Till Eulenspiegel

(redirected from Ulenspiegel)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Eulenspiegel, Till

(tĭl oi`lən-shpē'gəl) [Ger.,=owl-mirror, hence English Owlglass], a north German peasant clown of the 14th cent. who was immortalized in chapbooks describing his practical jokes on clerics and townsfolk. The first Till chapbook (c.1500) was probably in Saxon, but the story it told spread all over Europe and North Britain. Till is the hero of a tone poem by Richard Strauss and of many novels, poems, and stories. Tyll Ulenspiegel is one of the variant spellings.

Bibliography

See K. R. H. MacKenzie's adaptation in English, Master Tyll Owlglass (1890).


Till Eulenspiegel:

see Eulenspiegel, TillEulenspiegel, Till
[Ger.,=owl-mirror, hence English Owlglass], a north German peasant clown of the 14th cent. who was immortalized in chapbooks describing his practical jokes on clerics and townsfolk. The first Till chapbook (c.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Eulenspiegel, Till

wanders the Low Countries, living by his wits and avenging the evil deeds of King Philip. [Belg. Lit.: Benét, 325]

Eulenspiegel, Till

legendary peasant known for his pranks. [Ger. Folklore: Benét, 325–326]

Eulenspiegel, Till

roams Low Countries as soldier and deliverer. [Ger. Folklore: Benét, 325–326]
References in periodicals archive ?
Variously associated with Hermes, the god of magic, arcane knowledge, rhetoric, subterfuge, and theft; with Tyl Ulenspiegel and Maistre Pierre Falfeu, the merry pranksters of folk legend; with the Devil, that malevolent worker of mischief in the world who leaves behind him fire and the smell of sulfur; and with Ulysses, the classical exemplar of worldly curiosity, Panurge has been identified as an essentially negative--but at the same time a curiously attractive--character .
Freely adapting the traditional tales of the folk heroes Till Eulenspiegel (Ulenspiegel) and Lamme, he set his story in the 16th century, at the height of the Inquisition; the hero's father is burned at the stake as a heretic, and Ulenspiegel swears an oath to avenge him.
Panurge is the heroic companion of Pantagruel, in the best epic tradition; he also has the cunning of Ulysses, the drunken mirth of Falstaff, the roguishness of Jack Wilton and Tyl Ulenspiegel (his numerous pockets filled with innumerable tricks), the cynical but lighthearted opportunism of Chaucer's Pardoner, the magic powers of Shakespeare's Puck or Ariel.
The fourth section concentrates on the vast field of comic and satirical literature, linguistically mainly in the areas of High German, Low German, Lower Rhine, and Dutch dialects, with an awareness of indebtedness to the Latin and French traditions The familiar and irrepressible figure of Reynard the Fox is missing in this volume but the equally outrageous Till Ulenspiegel and a host of Fools make their presence felt.
Uncovering the origins and authorship of the early sixteenth-century Ein kurtzweilig Lesen von Dil Ulenspiegel has been a major preoccupation of scholars since Lappenberg's edition of 1854.
The only collection in any way comparable to Schwab's is that edited by Peter Suchsland, which provides texts of Fortunatus, Magelone, Siegfried, Ulenspiegel, Hans Clawert, Das Lalebuch, Faustus, and Die Heymonskinder.