Beck, Ulrich

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Beck, Ulrich

(1944-) German sociologist, best known for his ‘landmark’ volume Risk Society – Towards a New Modernity (1992, originally 1986) in which he argued that contemporary societies, compared with previous societies, are characterized, not so much by ‘high risk’, but by new kinds of risk arising from REFLEXIVE MODERNIZATION (see U. Beck, A. Giddens and S. Lash, 1994). It is the universality and the inescapability of risk that characterizes the new RISK SOCIETY. Beck's distinctive ideas can be seen as pointing to a ‘third way’ between modernist and postmodernist theories of contemporary society
References in periodicals archive ?
The German sociologist Ulrich Beck, who only recently passed away, talked about this as a "world risk society".
Johns's discussion of cosmopolite traveller, scholar, and writer Anna Jameson highlights what Ulrich Beck calls "cosmopolitan empathy" (Der kosmopolitische Blick oder Krieg ist Frieden [2004, 13-18]) and early transnationalism.
The house of Europe', wrote Ulrich Beck in 2013, 'is empty of people'.
En 1980, el sociologo aleman Ulrich Beck publico el libro La sociedad del riesgo, conforme al cual los seres humanos enfrentamos diferentes situaciones de riesgo, peligro o contingencia como resultado de la actitud irreflexiva respecto de la produccion industrial de la sociedad contemporanea, lo cual implica que optemos por el control y la toma de decisiones sobre una supuesta prevencion y probabilidad de eventos catastroficos, antes que modificar el modelo de produccion.
What we are experiencing is what sociologist Ulrich Beck called the "risk society," wherein scenarios we cannot predict are constantly escalating.
22) Buradan hareketle Ulrich Beck "ulusal" sifatinin, kullanildigi her yerde, ozellikle de "analiz birimi ulusal toplum veya ulusal devlet ya da her ikisi birdense", metodolojik ulusculugun habercisi olabilecegini savunmaktadir.
The sociologist Ulrich Beck wrote in the early 1990s that modern society is characterized by the feeling of risk, and perhaps this milieu of uncertainty-exacerbated by the fact that many of our foods are now imported and therefore difficult to keep track of-has driven people to seek foods that are 'safer' and more 'natural' over those with pesticides and other chemicals that may turn out to be harmful to human health.
These are the quotidian issues of immediate and pressing concern, what Ulrich Beck (1994) calls "sub politics.
These names are Anthony Giddens, Ulrich Beck, and Zygmunt Bauman.
Well-worded text introduces the ideas of theorists Ulrich Beck, Bell Hooks, and Michel Foucault and poet Adrienne Rich.
Lupton then moves to the heart of the book, an expanded discussion of the three sociocultural theories of risk--cultural/symbolic, risk society and governmentality--and their primary exponents: Mary Douglas, Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens, and Michel Foucault respectively.
She not only displays an informed and incisive insider's command of mainstream PR theory and practices, but she also reaches beyond internal analysis, imaginatively importing ideas and critical concepts drawn from the social theories of Ulrich Beck, Jurgen Habermas, Michel Foucault, Anthony Giddens, Manuel Castells, and others to explain the role that PR plays in late modernism and to advocate for its democratic transformation.