umbrella term


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umbrella term

A term used to cover a wide-ranging subject rather than one specific item. In many cases, umbrella terms are more marketing oriented than technical. Umbrella terms might be buzzwords for a while, but they often fade into the woodwork. See buzzword.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transgender-Used both as an umbrella term and as an identity.
There are elements of funk, punk, folk and more so we just use psychedelica as an umbrella term.
Both models are equipped with Mazda's i-ACTIVSENSE advanced safety technologies, an umbrella term covering a series of advanced safety features developed in line with Mazda Proactive Safety, which make use of detection devices such as milliwave radars and cameras.
IT'S an umbrella term for unexplained symptoms that can disturb the large intestine or colon, says chairman of charity the IBS Network Dr Nick Read.
Today "quasar" is used as an umbrella term for both types.
Parish was an umbrella term that encompassed not only the physical space of the church and its churchyard, she says, but also the congregation and even the district in which the members lived.
FASD is the umbrella term for the physical, learning and behavioural impacts caused by pre-natal exposure to alcohol.
Eight patients presenting with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - the umbrella term for a collection of lung diseases including chronic bronchitis and emphysema - and aged between 35 and 48, were studied by researchers at Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor hospital, for two years.
In this resource for in-service teachers, second language (L2) is used as an umbrella term to refer to both second language and foreign language instruction.
Another reader took issue with The Advocate's use of the word queer as an umbrella term to refer to LGBT people.
COPD, which stands for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is an umbrella term including chronic bronchitis and emphysema.
In addition, men who quit smoking in the 10 years preceding the first cognitive measure were still at risk of greater cognitive decline, especially in executive function (an umbrella term for various complex cognitive processes involved in achieving a particular goal).