Unisexual Flower

Unisexual Flower

 

a flower having stamens but no pistils or having pistils but no stamens. A flower having only stamens is said to be staminate, or male. A flower having only pistils is said to be pistillate, or female. In many unisexual flowers, the nonfunctioning organs of the other sex are present in reduced form, thus attesting to the plant’s original bisexual nature. Such flowers are said to be functionally male or functionally female.

The distribution of unisexual flowers on plants varies.

References in periodicals archive ?
Deceitful pollination by anther-mimicking stigma had been known earlier only in cases of species with unisexual flowers.
Developmental analyses reveal early arrests of the spore-bearing parts of reproductive organs in unisexual flowers of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.
americanus, has been described as having dioecious, unisexual flowers with either stamens or gynoecium aborting (Green 1958; Nesom 2012).
1990) and the occurrence of unisexual flowers in certain species almost restricted to Theligoneae and Anthospermae (Robbrecht, 1988).
The individual unisexual flowers lack a perianth, the pistillate flower consisting of 1 (rarely 2) pistil(s) subtended by a scale, and the staminate flower consisting of 1-3 stamens borne in a scale.
Historically, the designation "male" and "female" parts have often been applied to the stamens and carpels, respectively, and thus with unisexual flowers one might see reference to the male or female flower.
Different flower sexes and breeding systems have been reported for Bromeliaceae (Table 1) ranging from bisexual flowers to unisexual flowers and from xenogamy to cleistogmy.
Organ initiation and the development of unisexual flowers in the tassel and ear of Zea mays.
Monoecious A plant having unisexual flowers (staminate and pistillate) on the same plant.
Differential floral rewards and pollination by deceit in unisexual flowers.
Deviations from this common pattern include spatial segregation of the sexes into different unisexual flowers on the same plant (monoecy), unisexual flowers on different plants (dioecy), or intermediate combinations including gynodioecy, where female and hermaphroditic plants occur in populations.