Univac


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Univac

(processor, company)
A brand of computer.

There is a historical placard in the United States Census Bureau that has the following, "The Bureau of the Census dedicated the world's first electronic general purpose data processing computer, UNIVAC I, on June 14, 1951. Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation".

The Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation designed and built Univac. Over the years, rights to the Univac name changed hands several times. Circa 1987, Sperry Univac merged with the Burroughs Corporation to form Unisys Corporation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The technology used by insurance carriers, like the computing technology of much of corporate America, has come a long way since the early '50s when carriers brought their first UNIVAC 1 mainframes from a manufacturer then known as Remington Rand.
In 1962, Franklin Life bought a second UNIVAC 1 mainframe for $87,000.
Then, in 1964, the life insurer bought two second-hand UNIVAC machines for $1 apiece, says Cranwill.
At first, people were afraid to believe the computer," says Jon Eklund, a curator in the division of computers at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, where a UNIVAC control console is on display in the "Information Age" exhibition.
Even the odds given by that historic Remington Rand UNIVAC, one of six such computers in existence in 1952, weren't so bad: They were 100 to 1 in favor of Eisenhower, and that was based on only 3 million returns of a final total of about 61 million.
That retirement did not last long, and in August 1967 she was recalled to active duty for six months to lead Navy efforts to standardize COBOL for the Navy, and left UNIVAC on a special military leave of absence.
In today's terminology, A-2 was merely a simulated 3-address machine with some mathematical functions, but it was powerful indeed compared to machine code (since UNIVAC did not have a symbolic assembler at that time).
The Computer Science Conference (CSC) attendees in Louisville, Kentucky were privileged to inspect a recently renovated UNIVAC I.
The UNIVAC I was manufactured circa 1950 and marked the beginning of commercial computing.
New attractions will include the History of Computing Exhibit, which will feature the Atanasoff-Berry Computer, major components of a UNIVAC I, and other artifacts from The Computer Museum in Boston.
Featuring a display of the UNIVAC I and other computing artifacts on loan from the National Computer Museum in Boston.
He made contributions to the development of UNIVAC, the first commercial computer, and to the first alphanumeric dot matrix display, as well as scanning devices that would be critical components of modern medical imaging and counter-terrorism technology.