Van Allen belt


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Van Allen belt

either of two regions of charged particles above the earth, the inner one extending from 2400 to 5600 kilometres above the earth and the outer one from 13 000 to 19 000 kilometres. The charged particles result from cosmic rays and are trapped by the earth's magnetic field
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Van Allen belts contain energetic electrons and protons, the new concentration of radiation is composed of so-called anomalous cosmic rays, which result when the solar wind interacts with atomic nuclei that originate in thin gas between the stars.
The researchers discovered that different energy levels of electrons in the Van Allen belts can lead to vastly different shapes and sizes of the belts themselves.
Until the discovery, researchers thought the Van Allen belts always contained two zones of high-energy particles: an inner zone made mostly of protons and some electrons, and an outer zone dominated by electrons.
They passed through the enigmatic radioactive Van Allen Belts which extend from 4000 miles beyond the Earth, and with the interplanetary hunters steadily closing in, the astral forms of John and Ken entered the outer peripheries of Hades Belt, a vast semi-physical region encircling the earth, where many unquiet souls of our world go to.
The explosions also disrupted (perhaps permanently) the Van Allen Belts, which protect the Earth from the sun's rays.
Van Allen's primary cosmic ray experiment resulted in the discovery of the Van Allen Belts, two ring-shaped regions around the Earth in which charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field.
This, incidentally, was a notion I had in my first column for IR in April 1971, in which I speculated that the Van Allen Belts could be tapped into for their electric potential - or even short circuited.
These belts were at first called the Van Allen belts but were eventually referred to as the magnetosphere.
New designed space simulator provides complex testing of space technology: thermal vacuum tests simultaneous with imitation of effects of solar radiation and the Earth~s radiation, and the impact of the Van Allen belts, all influences together.
These Van Allen belts, held in place by Earth's magnetic field, are regions of high turbulence, shrinking and swelling in response to solar winds and flares.
The capsule also will travel through the high-radiation Van Allen belts surrounding Earth; engineers want to gauge the effects on the on-board computers.
Scientists discovered the Van Allen belts 55 years ago using the United States' first artificial satellite, Explorer 1.