Vendôme Column

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Vendôme Column

 

a 43.5-meter column on the Place Vendôme in Paris. The Vendôme Column was built between 1806 and 1810 by the architects J. B. Lepère and J. Gondouin in honor of the victories of Napoleon I. It was made of the bronze of enemy guns and crowned with a statue of Napoleon. On May 16, 1871, in connection with the decree of the Paris Commune on April 12, the column was removed as a symbol of militarism and wars of conquest. The Vendôme Column was restored in 1875 during the reactionary period that triumphed after the suppression of the Paris Commune of 1871.

REFERENCE

Parizhskaia Kommuna 1871 g., vol. 1. Moscow, 1961. Pages 489-93.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, as with the toppling of the Vendome Column, the contemporary protest landscape becomes radical in large part through its relationship to media and representation.
The reduction replica of the Vendome Column (also known as the Austerlitz Column or as the Column of the Grand Army) in Paris, examined here, was much more than just a simple souvenir bought by some foreign traveler making a Grand Tour sweep through Europe.
1) Interesting as the medallions may be, my present focus is upon the architectural model of the Vendome Column and what it has to say about France in the age of Napoleon and about the nineteenth century in general.
When Captain Nash purchased his miniaturized rendition of the Vendome Column he probably was given the choice of several different versions and sizes.
Perhaps thinking ahead to his own imperial ambitions, Napoleon proposed to crown this Vendome column with a statue of the legendary Charlemagne.
When completed in the late summer of 1810, the Vendome Column rose some 145 feet above the Place Vendome, surpassing the height of its Roman inspiration by almost 25 feet.
Once the monarchy had been securely restored, King Louis XVIII ordered a gigantic Bourbon fleur-de-lis flag to be flown (in lieu of a statue) from the top of the Vendome Column.
In as much as the Vendome Column is a monument devoid of all artistic value, tending to perpetuate by its expression the ideas of war and conquest of the past imperial dynasty, which are reproved by a republican nation's sentiment, citizen Courbet expresses the wish that the National Defense government will authorize him to disassemble this column.
Courbet joined the Paris Commune of 1871 and--following the collapse of the revolutionary government--was accused of complicity in the destruction of the Vendome column, ordered to pay a huge line for its reconstruction, and imprisoned.
The book's nine chapters present histories of French "memory objects" or "locations," ranging from the destruction of the Vendome column in May 1871 to the "tango-mania" of pre-1914 Paris.
My interests were not diverted to the Commune and the Vendome Column, but rather to these paintings.
As a historical reference, Creischer and Siekmann provided photographs of the Paris Commune of 1871: Fighters on the barricades and the toppled Vendome column inaugurate the field of photojournalism as the democratic medium par excellence of the late nineteenth century.