venturi meter

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Related to Venturi effect: Bernoulli's principle

venturi meter

[ven′tu̇r·ē ‚mēd·ər]
(engineering)
An instrument for efficiently measuring fluid flow rate in a piping system; a nozzle section increases velocity and is followed by an expanding section for recovery of kinetic energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The association of small VSD with more severe aortic valve disease may explain Venturi effect as the predominant mechanism behind cusp prolapse.
Many oxygen therapy devices employ the Venturi effect to accomplish air entrainment for the purpose of diluting 100% oxygen (used as the source gas) with room air.
Figure 3 shows another way the Venturi effect can damage a structure.
2] jet through a narrow orifice creates a Venturi effect and results in air entrapment and a marked increase in the total flow.
As the pressure reduces, the flow rate increases, creating a Venturi effect, puffing the cone back into the doughnut.
The well known Venturi effect is caused when a fluid flows through a constricted area: its speed increases and the pressure drops (Fig.
jeanneli builds chimneys up to 23 ft (7 m) tall that use the Venturi effect to suck air into the nest, thus cooling it by the evaporation of water.
When buildup begins in a channel furnace inductor, deposition is generally over the entire channel surface until constriction raises temperatures and, in combination with the venturi effect, prevents further channel deposits.
There are several possibilities for a venturi effect to suck air into the melt flow: ribs, ejector pins, poor mating of nozzle tip to sprue bushing, nozzle misalignment, and separated plates in a hot runner.
The Venturi effect creates a pressure differential that pulls the water and product through at a high speed with the capability of moving 300 gallons of water and product through the plenum per minute.
Yes, we often experience the mountain pass venturi effect on windy days in the Colorado mountains ("The Mountain Pass And Ridgeline Venturi Effect," February 2010), but three comments on a great article.